Daily Archives: Monday, April, 19, 2010

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for April 19

Where Teddy Bears Come From by Mark Burgess and Russell Ayto

LITTLE Wolf is about to set off on a special adventure.

He can’t sleep and needs a teddy bear. But where do they come from? Do you know?

A perfect Christmas story about one of the most important questions of all. [JPB BURGESS]

Mouse and Mole, Fine Feathered Friends by Wong Herbert Yee

It is a blustery spring day, and Mouse and Mole are very excited. They are going to go bird watching! They are planning to make bird books! Mouse and Mole pack paper and crayons and hurry outside. It turns out, birds are not so easy to watch. Splashing in puddles scare them away. Stepping on crunchy leaves does too.

Mole rubs his snout. Mouse twirls her tail. Together, they come up with a plan to get closer to the birds. A plan that includes glue and feathers . . .

Join Mouse and Mole on another high-flying adventure in which teamwork, brainstorming, and good ideas always make for a fun day out!         [JE YEE]

Dani Noir by Nova Ren Suma

“Zoom in on thirteen-year-old Dani Callanzano. The summer before eighth grade, Dani is stuck in her nothing-ever-happens town with only her favorite noir mysteries at the Little Art movie theatre to keep her company. But one day a real-life mystery begins to unravel — at the Little Art! And it all has something to do with a girl in polka-dot tights… Armed with a vivid imagination, a flair for the dramatic, and a knowledge of all things Rita Hayworth, Dani sets out to solve the mystery and learns more about herself than she ever thought she would.”         [J SUMA]

Sweethearts of Rhythm: the Story of the Greatest All-Girl Swing Band in the World by Marilyn Nelson

“In the 1940s, as the world was at war, a remarkable jazz band performed on the American home front. This all-female band, originating from a boarding school in the heart of Mississippi, found its way to the most famous ballrooms in the country, offering solace during the hard years of the war. They dared to be an interracial group despite the cruelties of Jim Crow laws, and they dared to assert their talents though they were women in a “man’s” profession. Told in thought-provoking poems and arresting images, this unusual look at our nation’s history is deep and inspiring.” [J811.54 NELSON]

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