Monday Children’s Book Reviews for February 1

Amelia Bedelia’s First Valentine by Herman Parish

“Literal-minded even as a child, Amelia Bedelia muddles through Valentine’s Day with her heart on her sleeve, trying to make sense of strange greetings at school and home, and ever on the look-out for the arrows of Cupid.”     [JPB PARISH]

School of Fear by Gitty Daneshvari

“Everyone is afraid of something…

Madeleine Masterson is deathly afraid of bugs, especially spiders.

Theodore Bartholomew is petrified of dying.

Lulu Punchalower is scared of confined spaces.

Garrison Feldman is terrified of deep water.

With very few options left, the parents of these four twelve year-olds send them to the highly elusive and exclusive School of Fear to help them overcome their phobias. But when their peculiar teacher, Mrs. Wellington, and her unconventional teaching methods turn out to be more frightening than even their fears, the foursome realize that this just may be the scariest summer of their lives.                                  [J DANESHVARI]

More Bones: Scary Stories from Around the World selected and retold by Arielle North Olson and Howard Schwartz

“Have you heard about the man who marries . . . a corpse? Or what about the magic school where one student in every class is never allowed to leave? Many of these tales go back hundreds of years and to the farthest corners of the earth, but as diverse as they are, they also reveal one important truth: everyone loves a scary story. The authors have dug deeply — from Egypt to Iceland — to find the spookiest stories that are perfect to share around a campfire or at a sleepover.”                     [J398.27 MORE]

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1 Comment

Filed under Book Reviews, Children, Reading, Uncategorized, Union City Library

One response to “Monday Children’s Book Reviews for February 1

  1. Achim Wagner

    If you submitted anything of the above to a German publisher you could start a nice collection of rejections. Over here children’s books seem to have to be gloomy and full of moral lessons. The less colorful, the better.
    But then, we can always use English – and we do. My illustrator and I just started, and at our current pace by 2020 we should be discussing the final page’s illustration.
    All the best to you from Germany
    Achim of Adewani

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