Monday Children’s Book Reviews for January 17, 2011

Children’s Classics Part 2: Early Readers

Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parrish

“Ever since Amelia Bedelia made her debut almost thirty years ago, young readers have been laughing out loud at the antics of this literal-minded but charming housekeeper who never fails to confound the Rogers family. After all, who knows better than Amelia Bedelia what “dust the furniture” and “dress a chicken” really mean!”                     [JE PARRISH]

Are You My Mother? by P. D. Eastman

“Never having seen his mother, after falling from his nest, a baby bird makes humorous mistakes trying to find her.”                                [JE EASTMAN]

A Bargain for Frances by Russell Hoban

“Thelma always seems to get Frances into trouble. When she tricks Frances into buying her tea set, it’s the last straw. Can Frances show her that it’s better to lose a bargain than lose a friend?”                                        [JE HOBAN]

The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss

“When a little boy plants a carrot seed, everyone tells him it won’t grow. But when you are very young, there are some things that you just know, and the little boy knows that one day a carrot will come up. So he waters his seed, and pulls the weeds, and he waits …

“First published in 1945 and never out of print, … a triumphant and deeply satisfying story for readers of all ages.”                           [JE KRAUSS]

Frog and Toad are Friends by Arnold Lobel

“Frog and Toad agreed: it was a perfect day for a swim. And Frog was kind enough not to look at Toad in his bathing suit, per Toad’s request. But when the swimming was over, a crowd had gathered to see Toad in his funny-looking suit, and neither Frog nor Toad could make them leave.

“The endearing pair hop along through five enchanting stories, looking for lost buttons, greeting the spring, and waiting for mail. Their genuine care for each other makes Frog and Toad two of the finest amphibious role models around.”                     [JE LOBEL]

Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss

“This timeless Dr. Seuss classic was first published in 1960, and has been delighting readers ever since. Sam-I-am is persistent, changing as many variables as possible in the hopes of convincing the nameless skeptic that green eggs and ham are a delicacy to be savored. He tries every manner of presentation — in a house, with a mouse, in a box, with a fox, with a goat, on a boat — to no avail. Then finally, finally the doubter caves under the tremendous pressure exerted by the tireless Sam-I-am. And guess what?”           [JE SEUSS]

Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik

“Enter the world of Little Bear. Children will be entranced by Little Bear’s trip to the moon, his birthday party, and his wishes and adventures.

“This is the first of the five classic books about Little Bear, introducing the funny and strikingly childlike bear cub and his friends. The combination of Else Holmelund Minarik’s simple, yet eloquent, stories and Maurice Sendak’s warm, tender illustrations have made this beloved character an enduring favorite among beginning readers.”                                         [JE MINARIK]

Morris and Boris by Bernard Wiseman

“Morris the Moose and Boris the Bear have three exasperating encounters.”         [JE WISEMAN]

Nate the Great by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat

“Shortly after a breakfast generously supplied with pancakes, Nate the Great got an urgent call from Annie.

“I lost a picture,” said Annie. “Can you help me find it?”

“Of course,” said Nate. “I have found lost balloons, books, slippers, chickens. Even a lost goldfish. Now I, Nate the Great, will find a lost picture.”

“Oh, good,” Annie said.

“Nate, with the cool detachment of a Sam Spade, immediately plunges into his new and baffling case. Getting all the facts, asking the right questions, narrowing down the suspects. Nate, the boy detective who “likes to work alone,” solves the mystery and tracks down the culprit. In the process he also discovers the whereabouts of Super Hex, the missing cat.”                       [JE SHARMAT]

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Filed under Book Reviews, Children, Reading, Uncategorized, Union City Library

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