Monday Children’s Book Reviews for October 31, 2011

Today is October 31, Hallowe’en. Lots of tradition, lore and stories are associated with Hallowe’en. Many things you will see on this day have their roots in Celtic and ancient Greek and Roman myths, beliefs and symbolism.

13 Nights of Halloween by Guy Vasilovich

“On the first night of Halloween, what does your mummy give you? A bright, shiny Skeleton Key, of course!

“In fact, for each of the thirteen nights leading up to the big night, your mummy is ready with gifts that include everything from singing skulls to demons dancing to icky eyeballs. The spookier and slimier, the better!

“From debut author-illustrator Guy Vasilovich comes a picture book that is sure to inspire even the youngest readers to start the creepy countdown to Halloween. Sing along to the tune of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” as you get ready for the scariest—and silliest—night of the year.”                                 [JPB VASILOVICH]

Halloween Surprise by Corinne Demas

“Halloween is almost here and Lily wants to make her own costume for trick-or-treating. Should she be a scary ghost? Or maybe a roly-poly pumpkin? Perhaps a glittery princess! After many ideas and a few wrong turns, Lily finally settles on a costume that will be perfect for a Halloween surprise with her cuddly kittens.”                      [JPB DEMAS]

Bone Dog by Eric Rohmann

“Sam doesn’t feel like doing much after his dog Ella dies. He doesn’t really even feel like dressing up for Halloween. But when Sam runs into a bunch of rowdy skeletons, it’s Ella — his very own Bone dog — who comes to his aid, and together they put those skeletons in their place. A book about friendship, loss, and a delightfully spooky Halloween.”                    [JPB ROHMANN]

Pumpkin Cat by Anne Mortimer

“Through the seasons, Cat and Mouse work together in the garden. Together, they watch seeds that turn into plants in the spring, and plants that turn into flowers in the summer, and flowers that turn into pumpkins in the fall!

“And when their pumpkins are finally ready, Mouse gives the best surprise of all to his friend, Cat!”                [JPB MORTIMER]

Half-Minute Horrors edited by Susan Rich

“How scared can you get in just thirty seconds?

“Dive into the shortest, scariest stories ever created, with more than seventy instant thrills from the likes of Lemony Snicket, James Patterson, Neil Gaiman, R.L. Stine, Holly Black, Brett Helquist, and Margaret Atwood. You’ll never look at your closet door, your cat, your sock drawer, or even yourself in the mirror the same way again!”             [J HALF-MINUTE]

Night of the Living Dust Bunnies by Erik Craddock

“While Stone Rabbit, Andy Wolf, and Henri Tortoise are trick-or-treating, zombie dust bunnies are taking over their town.

 “After months and months of neglecting his chores, all of the dirt in Stone Rabbit’s house has come to life—and it is turning all of the citizens of Happy Glades into evil living dust bunnies! Will our hero be able to clean up his town? Or will he be swept away by the fiendish filth?”              [J741.5973 CRADDOCK]

Ha-Ha Holidays Jokes to Tickle Your Funny Bone by Felicia Lowenstein Niven

“Includes jokes, limericks, knock-knock jokes, tongue twisters, and fun facts about Halloween and other holidays, and describes how to create funny greeting cards.”                       [J818.602 NIVEN]

The Story of Halloween by Carol Greene

“In the beginning, Halloween was a harvest festival during which the people of Great Britain, Ireland, and northern France gave thanks for their harvested crops. Over time, Halloween took on new meaning, and people believed that elves, spirits, and scary creatures roamed the earth.

“Now Halloween is a time for children to dress in costumes and go door to door in search of treats, but some ancient traditions are still part of this festive night. Find out how this spooky celebration became a much anticipated holiday.”             [J394.2646 GREENE]

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