Monday Children’s Book Reviews for August 18, 2014

Slow down! Enjoy every last minute of summer! Have you gone to the beach, or taken a picnic to the park? Have you roller skated, or ridden your bike? 

It’s not too late! How about calling some school friends you haven’t seen all summer. Pack a lunch and  ride your bikes to the park to have some fun and get reacquainted. 

And we have some great new books to find at the Library and enjoy:

The Worst Princess by Anna Kemp

“Princess Sue dreams of finding her Prince Charming. But when that Prince proves to be a bit more traditional than what she had hoped for, Princess Sue—along with the help of fiery dragon—becomes determined to find a way to get the fairy-tale ending that she always envisioned for herself.”       [JPB KEMP]

Oliver and the Seawigs by Philip Reeve and Sarah McIntyre

“When Oliver’s explorer parents go missing, he sets sail on a rescue mission with some new, unexpected friends: a grumpy albatross, a nearsighted mermaid . . . even a living island! But the high seas are even more exciting, unusual, and full of mischief than Oliver could have imagined. Can he and his crew spar with sarcastic seaweed, outrun an army of sea monkeys, win a fabulous maritime fashion contest, and defeat a wicked sea captain in time to save Mom and Dad?”                [J REEVE]

Python for Kids: A Playful Introduction to Programming by Jason R. Briggs

“Python is a powerful, expressive programming language that’s easy to learn and fun to use! But books about learning to program in Python can be kind of dull, gray, and boring, and that’s no fun for anyone.

“Python for Kids brings Python to life and brings you (and your parents) into the world of programming. The code in this book runs on almost anything: Windows, Mac, Linux, even an OLPC laptop or Raspberry Pi!”         [J005.133 BRIGGS]

Junk Drawer Physics: 50 Awesome Experiments That Don’t Cost a Thing by Bobby Mercer

“More than 50 great hands-on experiments that can be performed for just pennies, or less. Turn a plastic cup into a pinhole camera using waxed paper, a rubber band, and a thumbtack. Build a swinging wave machine using a series of washers suspended on strings from a yardstick. Or construct your own planetarium from an empty potato chip canister, construction paper, scissors, and a pin. Each project has a materials list, detailed step-by-step instructions with illustrations, and a brief explanation of the scientific principle being demonstrated. Junk Drawer Physics also includes sidebars of fascinating physics facts, such as did you know the Eiffel Tower is six inches taller in summer than in winter because its steel structure expands in the heat?”      [J530.078 MERCER]

Sticky Fingers: DIY Duct Tape Projects: Easy to Pick Up, Hard to Put Down by Sophie Maletsky

Sticky Fingers is a vibrant, easy-to-follow, step-by-step guide to creating amazing projects with the hottest crafting material on the market today – duct tape! The book includes tons of photographs alongside directions designed to make creating a wallet and making a bag even easier, while also providing a steady stream of ideas for personalizing and embellishing your duct tape creations. Each project includes icons showing difficulty level and project time, as well as helpful hints, such as how to keep your scissors clean and what to do with end pieces. So grab a roll of duct tape, pick a project, and get started!”            [745.5 MALETSKY]

Sew It! Make 17 Projects with Yummy Precut Fabric by Allison Nicoll

“Get your budding quilter sewing with 17 easy and fun projects made mostly from precuts. With the time they’ll save on cutting, they’ll be able to get down to the business of creating right away. From an earphones pouch to a pillow to, of course, quilts, and even a sleepover set—Sew It! presents kids with a broad range of projects for all skill levels that will teach them quiltmaking basics while challenging them to build their skill sets. All the projects are designed to be sewn on a domestic machine and can be completed without adult assistance.”              [J746 NICOLL]

 

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