Monday Children’s Book Reviews for December 1, 2014

Just Right For Two by Tracey Corderoy

“Dog’s big blue suitcase is the perfect fit for all the little treasures he has collected. He is sure that he is happy with just himself and his suitcase. Until one night when Mouse comes along, and Dog discovers that his big blue suitcase is actually just right for two.”     [JPB CORDEROY]

More and More by Emma Dodd

“Rhyming text helps a little monkey understand that his parents love him more and more each day.”                            [JPB DODD]

Sparkers by Eleanor Glewwe

“In the city of Ashara, magicians rule all.

“Marah Levi is a promising violinist who excels at school and can read more languages than most librarians. Even so, she has little hope of a bright future: she is a sparker, a member of the oppressed lower class in a society run by magicians.

“Then a mysterious disease hits the city of Ashara, turning its victims’ eyes dark before ultimately killing them. As Marah watches those whom she loves most fall ill, she finds an unlikely friend in Azariah, a wealthy magician boy. Together they pursue a cure in secret, but more people are dying every day, and time is running out. Then Marah and Azariah make a shocking discovery that turns inside-out everything they thought they knew about magic and about Ashara, their home.”                             [J GLEWWE,E]


Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth
by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm

“It’s time to learn about the role of carbon and fossil fuels on planet Earth! As much as our news is packed with articles about the importance of fossil fuels to the world economy, and the global warming caused by increased carbon emissions, few people understand what is happening. Now Bang and Chisholm present a clear, concise explanation of the fossil-fuel energy cycle that began with the sun and now runs most of the manufacturing, transportation, and energy use in our world. Here is a stunning, simple book that will educate readers about how fossil fuels are really buried sunlight–energy caught from the sun by plants that were later trapped deep underground for millions of years. Now that this plant matter has been transformed into fuel, humans have been digging it up, changing the fragile dynamic that fulfills the global needs of all living things. In this fourth book of the award-winning ‘Sunlight Series,’ Bang and Chisholm share yet another example of the intricate connection between the sun and life itself.”         [J333.82 BANG]

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Filed under Book Reviews, Children, Reading, Union City Library

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