Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 23, 2015

cornucopiaThanksgiving Day is this Thursday, November 26.

Giving thanks for the Creator’s gifts had always been a part of Wampanoag daily life. From ancient times, Native People of North America have held ceremonies to give thanks for successful harvests, for the hope of a good growing season in the early spring, and for other good fortune such as the birth of a child. Giving thanks was, and still is, the primary reason for ceremonies or celebrations.

“The arrival of the Pilgrims and Puritans brought new Thanksgiving traditions to the American scene. Today’s national Thanksgiving celebration is a blend of two traditions: the New England custom of rejoicing after a successful harvest, based on ancient English harvest festivals; and the Puritan Thanksgiving, a solemn religious observance combining prayer and feasting.”

Many cultures have a tradition of celebrating the harvest. Even though people have different traditions, family, friends and food are important.

we celebrate thanksgiving We Celebrate Thanksgiving in Fall by Rebecca Felix

“Level 1 guided reader that examines how people celebrate Thanksgiving. Students will develop reading skills while learning about Thanksgiving activities and foods.”     [JE 394.2649 FELIX]

paper crafts for thanksgivingPaper Crafts for Thanksgiving by Randel McGee

“Explains the significance of Thanksgiving and how to make Thanksgiving-themed crafts out of paper”            [J745.5941 MCGEE]

thanksgiving origami Thanksgiving Origami by Ruth Owen

” Origami pilgrim — Oriogami turkey — Origami pumpkins — Origami ears of corn — Origami apple harvest — Origami autumn leaves”              [ J736.982 OWEN]

katie saves thanksgivingKatie Saves Thanksgiving by Fran Manushkin

“When a snowstorm causes the power to go out Katie and her parents think their Thanksgiving dinner with JoJo and Pedro is ruined, but by being a good neighbor, Katie saves the day.”                        [JE MANUSHKIN,F]

happy thanksgiving Happy Thanksgiving by Abbie Mercer

“Describes how people celebrate Thanksgiving, explains when and why it is celebrated, tells the story of the first Thanksgiving, and provides instructions for creating a pinecone turkey and a pumpkin pie.”                     [J394.2649 MERCER]

national geographic kids cookbookNational Geographic Kids Cookbook by Barton Seaver

“Join Barton Seaver—master chef and National Geographic Explorer—on a year-round culinary adventure as he explores what it takes to create the ultimate dish. Barton provides mouthwatering recipes, the ins and outs of healthy eating, awesome crafts and activities, and food-focused challenges, proving once and for all that cooking can be a blast. Follow along as he teaches you to plant a kitchen garden, host a dinner party for your friends, and pack the perfect school lunch. Other highlights include ways to play with your food, festive holiday meals, snow day snacks, and family cooking competitions. With fascinating sidebars, profiles on real people, and cool facts, the National Geographic Kids Cookbook will have you ruling the kitchen in no time!”                    [J641.5 SEAVER]

international cookbook for kids International Cookbook For Kids by Matthew Locricchio

“The International Cookbook for Kids is packed with features that make cooking a snap: 6 classic recipes from Italy, France, China, and Mexico; More than 1 full-color photographs and illustrations; Hardcover with concealed spiral binding that lies flat when open; Easy-to-follow recipe format; Kid-tested recipes; Chef’s tips discussing ingredients, nutrition, and technique; Safety section discussing basic kitchen precautions; Cooking terms and definitions; Special taco-party section; Includes dishes of every kind: Appetizers, Salads, Soups, Main Dishes, Vegetables and Sides, and Desserts.”                            [J641.5622 LOCRICCHIO]

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Filed under Book Reviews, Children, Events, Older Adults, Reading, Teens, Uncategorized, Union City Library

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