Monday Children’s Book Reviews for February 1, 2016

redRed by Jan De Kinder

“In this poignant story, a girl finds it funny when her classmate starts blushing on the school playground. Her friends laugh along with her, but one student takes the teasing too far. Torn between her sympathy for her classmate and her fear of the bully, the girl must make a difficult choice.”  A United States Board on Books for Young People 2015 Outstanding International Book Award winner.        [JPB DE KINDER]

wrinkled crownThe Wrinkled Crown by Anne Nesbet

“In the enchanted village of Lourka, almost-twelve-year-old Linny breaks an ancient law. Girls are forbidden to so much as touch the town’s namesake musical instrument before their twelfth birthday or risk being spirited away. But Linny can’t resist the call to play a lourka, so she builds one herself.

“When the punishment strikes her best friend instead, Linny must leave home to try to set things right. With her father’s young apprentice, Elias, along for the journey, Linny travels from the magical wrinkled country to the scientific land of the Plain, where she finds herself at the center of a battle between the logical and the magical.”              [J NESBET]

food of the worldFood of the World by Nancy Leowen and Paula Skelley

“With simple, rhyming text and vibrant full-page photographs, young readers will love this showcase of the world’s diversity. From clothing to food to homes to our very faces, humans are both individual and universal.”                                     [ J394.12 LOEWEN]

big problemThe Big Problem (And the Squirrel Who Eventually Solved It): Understanding Adjectives and Adverbs by Nancy Loewen

“The squirrels have a problem. A BIG, POLKA-DOTTED problem. And they’re watching NERVOUSLY, CURIOUSLY to see what it will do next. This goofy little story, complemented by informational back matter, teaches readers the differences between adjectives and adverbs.”             [J425.5 LOEWEN]

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Filed under Book Reviews, Children, Reading, Teens, Union City Library

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