Monday Children’s Book Reviews for May 23, 2016

tell me a tattoo storyTell Me a Tattoo Story by Alison McGhee and Eliza Wheeler

“A  modern father-son love story. The father tells his little son the story behind each of his tattoos, and together they go on a beautiful journey through family history. There’s a tattoo from a favorite book his mother used to read him, one from something his father used to tell him, and one from the longest trip he ever took. And there is a little heart with numbers inside—which might be the best tattoo of them all.”                  [JPB McGHEE,A]

whyWhy? by Crispin Boyer

“The concept is simple. Got a question? Well now you have an answer! 1,111 of them, in fact. Want to know why your snot is yellow? Flip to the human body chapter. What’s on the inside of a turtle shell? The animal section’s got you covered. What’s in the deepest part of the ocean? Why doesn’t Earth just float off into space? Check, check, and check. With hundreds of topics ranging from silly to serious, we’ve got the expert information you need in a fun and entertaining format that will keep kids digging for answers. Answers include all kinds of fascinating extra info like top ten lists, weird-but-true facts, explorer profiles, and cool activities. Now, go stump your parents!”                    [J031 BOYER]

picturepediaPicturepedia: An Encyclopedia on Every Page

“Thousands of detailed, full-color photographs and illustrations catalog subjects ranging from history and space to the natural world and prehistoric life in a mini-encyclopedia that provides capsule profiles, visual timelines and other essential facts.

“Chapters on science and technology, nature, geography, culture, sports and hobbies, and history cover insects, musical instruments, spacecraft, world maps, famous discoveries, prehistoric life, and more. Every double-page spread contains a wealth of information on a given topic, with galleries, lists, sequences, facts, timelines, and much more; while every topic is illustrated with up to 100 photos, graphics, and illustrations.”             [J031 PICTUREPEDIA]

awesome ideasAwesome Ideas by Daniel Lipkowitz

“LEGO® Awesome Ideas is an all-new ideas book that unlocks the secrets of LEGO building and shows fans how to create a world with their imagination. Beautifully clear photography and informative text demonstrates how entire models are built up while also providing step-by-step visual breakdowns and offering alternative ways to build models.

“With creative model ideas and visual tips and techniques, LEGO Awesome Ideas will inspire anyone, from beginners to accomplished builders.”         [J689-725 LIPKOWITZ]

top 10 gamingTop 10 Gaming by Paul Terry

“Top 10 for Kids Gaming is a game-ready book full of checklists about gaming which display fun facts and illustrations in a humorous way that only kids understand. It has more than just Top 10 lists. A team of four cool kids interject humor and introduce “Killer Facts” and “The Lowdown” details.”                        [J794.8 TERRY]

jazz dayJazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxanne Orgill and Francis Vallejo

“When Esquire magazine planned an issue to salute the American jazz scene in 1958, graphic designer Art Kane pitched a crazy idea: how about gathering a group of beloved jazz musicians and photographing them? He didn’t own a good camera, didn’t know if any musicians would show up, and insisted on setting up the shoot in front of a Harlem brownstone. Could he pull it off? In a captivating collection of poems, Roxane Orgill steps into the frame ofHarlem 1958, bringing to life the musicians’ mischief and quirks, their memorable style, and the vivacious atmosphere of a Harlem block full of kids on a hot summer’s day. Francis Vallejo’s vibrant, detailed, and wonderfully expressive paintings do loving justice to the larger-than-life quality of jazz musicians of the era. Includes bios of several of the fifty-seven musicians, an author’s note, sources, a bibliography, and a foldout of Art Kane’s famous photograph.”                    [J811.6 ORGILL,R]

 

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Filed under Book Reviews, Children, Reading, Teens, Union City Library

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