Category Archives: Links

Ayurveda@Union City Library

SATURDAY
APRIL 29, 2017
10:30-11:30

Health and Wellness through Alternative Medicine (Ayurveda)
Ayurveda is an alternative system of medicine and an ancient healing tradition from India. In this workshop, you will learn about the body’s three basic elements. You will also be shown how to balance them with
 herbs and rejuvenation therapy
 healthy diet and lifestyle choices
 techniques for emotional control
Soumya Upadhyay is an award-winning Ayurvedic physician trained in India. She is a health researcher and has a passion for alternative medicine. She has a deep interest in educating people about how to promote health and healthy behaviors by informing them about healthy lifestyle changes.

 

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Book Club @ Union City Library

Every Woman’s Dream
by
Mary Monroe

Two best friends embark on online
dating adventures trying to make up for lost time and failed marriages, only to become
involved in a deadly game.

For more information contact
the community contact  Joan Grower 510-792-7512
or Union City Library 510-745-1464

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NOWRUZ CELEBRATION 2017 @ Union City Library

Union City Library Presents
Nowruz Celebration

Saturday March 4, 2017

 3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

 Please join us for a performance by the Shahrzad Dance Company in celebration of Nowruz, the

New Year (spring equinox) in Afghanistan, Iran and Tajikistan.

 Shahrzad Khorsandi is the author of The Art of Persian Dance and is the founder of http://www.dancepersian.org.

 This event is part of a series of 150 free Art IS Education events for youth and families presented by Alameda County Library in partnership with the Alameda County Arts Commission and the Alameda County Office of Education to celebrate arts education and creativity.

artised nowruz2017
 

 

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The Art of Persian Dance

artiseducation2017The Art of Persian Dance is the first book published to establish a formalized pedagogy which encompasses the foundational principals of Persian dance technique. The Art of Persian Dance provides the structure and vocabulary for teaching a style of dance that has been part of Persian culture for millennia. It details body positions, rules for achieving correct body line, and descriptions and illustrations of the patterns and transitions that define the technowruz2017nique. Shahrzad has spent almost 20 years studying and exploring the depths of aesthetics distinct to Persian culture once the center of the ancient Persian Empire to isolate those elements that define the movements as Persian. Her vast repertoire of original choreography is based on these Persian aesthetics. Her commitment to creating a comprehensive method for teaching this technique, including categorization of movements and positions, and establishing a nomenclature, have made her a pioneer in the dance community.

Shahrzad Dance Company @ Union City Library

Nowruz Celebration

Saturday March 4, 2017,  3:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Please join us for the performance by Shahrzad Dance Company. 

The dance piece Rangin-kaman (Rainbow) is a story about peace and dialogue between civilizations. The dance will be performed in the style of classical Persian dance, accompanied by brief narrations between the sections. The program will also include an interactive Persian dance demonstration, and a question & answer session.

Nowruz is the celebration of the New Year (spring equinox) in Afghanistan, Iran and Tajikistan.

 

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Write Your Story…Discover & Go

THE RAMA EPIC:

HERO, HEROINE, ALLY, FOE
Asian Art Museum  free passes are available through Discover & Go program from the Library website 
The exhibition ends JAN 15, 2017

Bloody battles, daring rescues, passionate romance and a shape-shifting monkey warrior.

One of the world’s greatest works of literature, the Rama epic — the 2,500-year-old classic and its many versions — teems with excitement. The story of Prince Rama’s quest to defeat a powerful demonic king, rescue his abducted wife and re-establish order in the world is also, for many, a sacred tradition. For centuries, this beloved tale has been told again and again through visual and performing arts, literature and religious teachings in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and beyond.  

This exhibition invites you to explore the personalities and perspectives of four main characters: Rama; his wife Sita; Rama’s faithful monkey lieutenant Hanuman; and the 10-headed demon king Ravana. Spanning the ancient to the contemporary, this major international survey of 135 artworks captures the epic in a new light. Coursing beneath the drama and fantasy of the thrilling tale, discover timeless human struggles and poignant moments that will resonate with your own story.

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 January 17 & February 21

and March 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please bring pen & paper, or whatever you would like to use when writing.

Union City Library 510-284-0629

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Write Your Story…Real Stories by Three Different Journalists

Door to door : the magnificent, maddening, mysterious world of transportation / Edward Humes

The Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and author of Garbology explores the daily miracles and madness behind ourdoor-to-door
have-it-now, same-day-delivery world, revealing just what it takes—and costs—to move us and our stuff door to door.

Using interviews, data and deep exploration of the hidden world of ports, traffic control centers, and the research labs defining our transportation future, acclaimed journalist Edward Humes breaks down the complex movements of humans, goods, and machines as never before, from increasingly car-less citizens to the distance UPS goes to deliver a leopard-printed phone case. Tracking one day in the life of his family in Southern California, Humes uses their commutes, traffic jams, grocery stops, and online shopping excursions as a springboard to explore the paradoxes and challenges inherent in our system. He ultimately makes clear that transportation is one of the few big things we can change—our personal choices do have a profound impact, and that fork in the road is coming up fast.

 

The unnatural world : the race to remake civilization in Earth’s newest age / David Biello

An award-winning environmental journalist, combining the historical perspective of The Song of the Dodo with theunnatural-world urgency of An Inconvenient Truth, examines the world we have created and chronicles the scientists, billionaires and ordinary people who are working toward saving the best home humanity is likely to ever have.

 

organicOrganic : a journalist’s quest to discover the truth behind food labeling / Peter Laufer, Ph.D

“After eating some suspect “organic” walnuts that he was shocked to find were produced in Kazakhstan, veteran journalist Peter Laufer traces the origins of items in his pantry back to the source, learning how easily we are tricked into buying “organic” claims”–

View the book trailer for Organic at: ….

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 December 20 & January 17

and February 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please  bring pen & paper

Union City Library 510-284-0629

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Write Your Story… Doors

The Story Behind a Door

 Submitted by the Union City Library Member Rita K.

At Discover —I recently asked Divyakshi Gupta- a photographer and traveler based in Mumbai — about her obsession with doors:

I often think doors are veils to homes. Each have a distinct character, speaking volumes of the people living behind the door. It’s fun to guess what could possibly be behind a door — an array of secrets, emotions, and mysteries. A home with laughter, heartaches, hopes, banter, and more.

Behind every door is a story, says Divyakshi. I love this thought: that any door you encounter — while walking through your neighborhood or exploring a new place — can lead to a story, an opportunity, or a glimpse into another’s life.

For this Discover Challenge, let’s focus on a door. You’re free to interpret this challenge as you see fit, and respond in any genre or medium, as long as a door — real or imagined — is your primary inspiration. Ideas:

 

▪ Memoirists and nonfiction writers: Tell us about the time you were hesitant to physically enter a building. Share a story about the childhood home you miss. Describe a day when you felt, symbolically, that a door to something new opened, or a door to your past closed.

▪ Short story and fiction writers: Creatively use a door as the main setting of your story. Personify a door in your tale.

▪ Poets: Write a haiku or sonnet — or your preferred poetic form — about a door, or entering or exiting a place or phase in your life.

▪ Photographers: Get inspired by the doors of India captured by Divyakshi, or these doors I’ve photographed on my travels, then get outside and capture your own.

▪ Artists: Draw a door you’ve encountered while out on a walk, illustrate a door in your own home, or sketch a doorway during a museum visit.

For this challenge, the door is wide open.

DOORS:  Insights & Comments

Transition and metamorphosis are the most common ideas represented by the symbol of the door; it is a passage from one place to another, between different states, between lightness and darkness. According to Julien, the act of passing over the threshold signifies that one must leave behind his materialism and personality to confront inner silence and meditation. It is abandoning the old and embracing the new; an open door signifies welcome and invites discovery and investigation, while a closed door represents rejection, protection, secrecy, exclusion, and imprisonment.

Is a feminine symbol in connection with the hole that it leads to, the vagina; the antithesis of the wall. Doors hold the essence of mystery, separating two distinct areas, keeping things apart. They are a barrier, a boundary, which must be negotiated, before the threshold can be crossed. The mysterious beyond is hidden from sight by the closed door, and some sort of action must be taken before the other side becomes visible and available to us. The closed door is full of potential, for anything might lie beyond, as yet unknown and unseen. Yet the closed door may also be limiting, preventing us ever gaining access to its hidden contents.

Sometimes gaining access may be as simple as approaching and turning the handle, but perhaps the door is locked. Then we need to knock or ring the bell and negotiate with the guardian or keeper of the door. Saying the right words, or holding the correct credentials will then secure our passage. This theme recurrs in countless fairytales and myths, from Ali Baba to Cuchulin. Belonging to the club or group which lies within, or paying the doorkeeper might also secure passage, but some doors remain stubbornly closed, unless you hold the key.

The doors may remain closed to protect those who live within, or to maintain a secret, or to keep a space sacred and to keep out the profane. These nunnery doors are heavily fortified, and their protective powers are boosted by the stone guardians watching from above. Lions, bulls and flames are frequent guardian symbols found on and around doors, adding to the protective qualities of the barrier.

So when we face a closed door, we face a choice. What action will we take? Will we turn back defeated by the barrier,or will we push forwards and attempt to gain access? The nature of the door itself, and its guardians may well shape our choice, helping us decide if we will feel comfortable with what lies beyond. The symbolism of a door closing on us, is one of an opportunity fading, of a potential now lost to us.. That way no longer lies open to us without negotiation and effort.

The symbolism of a door opening to us, is one of exciting new potential. The block which stood before us has now been removed and we are free to move forwards, and to cross the threshold into something new. We are invited forwards into change, with nothing to negotiate except the transition of one place to another. The guardian of the threshold is welcoming us forwards. Change beckons us with open arms.

So the door is protective guarding the doorway, denying or allowing passage through from one place or one state to another. The symbolism of the door is closely bound with the symbols of doorways and thresholds, and of keys and locks, hinges and handles, bells and guardians. The door itself either allows movement forwards or prevents it, and in this way we can see the door as a symbol of duality, as it is either closed or open, locked or unlocked.

SYMBOLISM OF DOORS

Doors hold the essence of mystery, separating two distinct areas, keeping things apart. They are a barrier, a boundary, which must be negotiated, before the threshold can be crossed. The mysterious beyond is hidden from sight by the closed door, and some sort of action must be taken before the other side becomes visible and available to us. The closed door is full of potential, for anything might lie beyond, as yet unknown and unseen. Yet the closed door may also be limiting, preventing us ever gaining access to its hidden contents.

Sometimes gaining access may be as simple as approaching and turning the handle, but perhaps the door is locked. Then we need to knock or ring the bell and negotiate with the guardian or keeper of the door. Saying the right words, or holding the correct credentials will then secure our passage. This theme recurrs in countless fairytales and myths, from Ali Baba to Cuchulin. Belonging to the club or group which lies within, or paying the doorkeeper might also secure passage, but some doors remain stubbornly closed, unless you hold the key.

The doors may remain closed to protect those who live within, or to maintain a secret, or to keep a space sacred and to keep out the profane. These nunnery doors are heavily fortified, and their protective powers are boosted by the stone guardians watching from above. Lions, bulls and flames are frequent guardian symbols found on and around doors, adding to the protective qualities of the barrier.

When we face a closed door, we face a choice. What action will we take? Will we turn back defeated by the barrier,or will we push forwards and attempt to gain access? The nature of the door itself, and its guardians may well shape our choice, helping us decide if we will feel comfortable with what lies beyond. The symbolism of a door closing on us, is one of an opportunity fading, of a potential now lost to us.. That way no longer lies open to us without negotiation and effort.

Symbolism of a door opening to us, is one of exciting new potential. The block which stood before us has now been removed and we are free to move forwards, and to cross the threshold into something new. We are invited forwards into change, with nothing to negotiate except the transition of one place to another. The guardian of the threshold is welcoming us forwards. Change beckons us with open arms.

So the door is protective guarding the doorway, denying or allowing passage through from one place or one state to another. The symbolism of the door is closely bound with the symbols of doorways and thresholds, and of keys and locks, hinges and handles, bells and guardians. The door itself either allows movement forwards or prevents it, and in this way we can see the door as a symbol of duality, as it is either closed or open, locked or unlocked.

The root of the English word door lies in the Sanskrit word Duarah, which means two doors or gates. From this comes the Greek Thura, the German Tur, Middle English Dure or Dor, Old Norse Dyrr and these all mean door. We also find the Gaulish Doro which means mouth, giving us an interesting image of the lips as double doors to our mouths and the words beyond. A guarded way in and out of our bodies.

Write Your Story

@

the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 November 15 & December 20

and January 17

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please  bring pen & paper

Union City Library 510-284-0629

 

 

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