Category Archives: Older Adults

Family Dance Party

FamilyDancePartyWP

This Sunday, July 8th, 3 – 4 pm there will be music and dancing in the library!

Rock ‘n’ Roll dance classics will be performed live by Bay Area musicians, Along Came Jones!   Come and listen!  Come and dance!  Come and browse books while infectious rock ‘n’ roll dance grooves play!  No registration required.  Event will be on the main library floor.  Bring the whole family!

Enjoy some great 50s and 60s dance classics in anticipation of the event:

Browse our catalog for more Rock ‘n’ Roll and rockabilly CDs to check out!  Get started here.

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Write Your Story…Cuyahoga

Cuyahoga

Bruce Haase

This is a second draft of a chapter of the fictional ‘faux-auto-biographical’ novel that I’m writing. It’s the story of two boys and a girl, born on the East side in Cleveland, Ohio in November 1943, and goes to the summer of 1959… “Cuyahoga” is the County that Cleveland is in.

June 2018

* * *

Mrs. Hagopian’s Goat

In the early hours of a still frigid April 1956 day, twelve year old Charlie did his now daily charitable task. He had discovered that the Hagopian Family (who weren’t his newspaper customers) had a young goat in their garage. Charlie was captivated by the goat, plus he was feeling sorry for the poor thing, living in a 50 year old, unheated garage with a non-running, spider infested, ’36 Ford. Since Charlie fancied himself a decent, and possibly heroic young man, after his route, at 6:30, he’d walk past the st

ill sleeping house and carefully open the garage’s side door to pet and feed a snack to Gary the goat. Actually the goat was unnamed, only Charlie seemed to care enough about Gary to name him and pet him. Charlie didn’t know if Gary was a boy goat. Maybe he should have named her Gretchen.

By Easter Sunday, the weather was better and Gary was on a chain in the back yard, the weeds were chomped short and Gary was pretty plump. Gary or Gretchen liked the morning treat and rub down, he or she knew that Charlie was due and was pulling the chain taut, eager for his upcoming visitor.

The Saturday following Easter, Gary wasn’t there. Mrs. Hagopian saw Charlie and came out. She told Carlie that the goat had been slaughtered and was being prepared at the Armenian Butcher shop for a Madagh feast to be held at the Armenian/American Social Hall the next day. She invited Charlie to come and join in the festivities.

In a most unheroic manner Charlie shook his head and ran away. He was horrified, the Armenians were cannibals and had killed Gary and were going to devour him, probably raw.

When Charlie calmed down, his natural curiosity took over. At the library in the following month, Charlie learned a lot about traditions, prejudice, Armenia, Genocide, independence, immigration, Greece, Turkey and more. One afternoon he went to the Hagopian house and apologized to Mrs. Hagopian for his rude behavior in running away from her invitation. She explained about the goat, why, from the day that they had bought him, they had never named him or made a pet of him, his existence to them was to be a sacrifice, that’s all. Next year it would be another families job to raise a goat or a lamb for the Madagh feast.

She invited Charlie to come to supper that evening, he accepted. At 5:30 Mr. Hagopian and two adult sons sat down with Charlie, they nodded to him. Mrs. Hagopian served from the stove, she flitted about, and didn’t sit down. Like a mother robin she made sure the chicks were fed. There was no conversation, a few grunts, a belch or two, some slurping, then a final wiping the plate with a piece of Wonder bread and chairs squeaking back, and the three men went to the living room TV for a beer, the sports report and a game show.

Charlie helped Mrs. Hagopian clear the table, then she dished up her food and sat down to eat. Charlie sat with her and they talked. He asked her about a “Madagh”. She told him it was a commemoration for the million and a half victims of “The Genocide”. She told him of Armenia, of the Armenia that she remembered as a girl, she told of moving to Ottoman Turkey when she was ten, of the Genocide of the Armenian people that started when she was twelve. She told of camps, refugees, walking, hiding, hunger, finally stowing-away aboard a ship to Portugal. Of her older girl cousin, named Lusine (meaning mysterious), somehow obtaining legal passage for them to Boston. Them being sent to Cleveland to be live-in servants to a rich Croatian family on the east side, near Shaker Heights, being set-up at eighteen to marry Mister Hagopian, a man 21 years older then herself. A man that she barely knew. She told Charlie of teaching herself to read English from the newspapers, of the four children that she bore and raised for Mr. Hagopian. She told of the two oldest, both daughters. How each were married when they were eighteen. How each married boys that they knew and chose for themselves. How happy her girls were to drop the name Hagopian, and move to the West Coast and a new way of life, near the clean, white California sands.

Charlie helped her wash and dry the dishes, he told her how much her liked her cooking. In the background, the television set quietly murmured, the three men snored, probably not dreaming about their brutal steel mill jobs. Mrs. Hagopian tousled Charlies hair, and told him, “you good boy to listen to old woman’s stories.”

She left the kitchen and came back with a small shoe box, covered in Christmas wrapping and decorated with ribbons. Carefully she opened it and took out a colorful silk and cotton wrapped treasure. It was a cheap child’s toy tea cup, broken, chipped, and carefully glued. It was her sole possession for her girlhood in Armenia, before they moved to Turkey. It was priceless to her, she cradled it then gently kissed the cup, she told of her father and mother and brother and sisters, her five family members of whom she knew nothing since 1916.

Eyes closed, she tightly held her cup, and told of herself as a 9 year old girl, the youngest in a healthy, and happy young family. They were picnicking in a meadow, under an Ash tree, laughing and sipping pomegranate juice from the child’s tea set. That picnic was during the good days, safe, under a clean Armenian sky, with puffy pure white clouds, the scents of flowers and spices in the air, song birds singing joyously. She clutched her little cup to her chest, her eyes were closed. Her cheeks were damp.

Charlie quietly let himself out of the kitchen door, dusk was sneaking up. He looked at the goat’s chain hanging from a nail on the old garage. Weeds in the small, un-landscaped back yard were reappearing, there was no goat to stop them.

Walking home Charlie thought about the refugees, immigrants, non-english speakers. Brave people, seeking freedom and safety, coming to a strange, and foreign new country. His four grandparents had all done that, the three that he had so fleetingly known were gone now, he had never heard their stories about their lives in the old country.

Four grandparents, all dead and no one to tell their stories. Someone should have written them down. Maybe someone should write down Mrs. Hagopian’s stories. Maybe he should help her do that this summer.

Charlie thought, from now on, maybe he wouldn’t make fun of immigrants and their funny clothes, their funny accents, their odd ideas, foods, and traditions. Maybe sacrificing a goat or lamb once a year is very meaningful to them. Maybe we shouldn’t judge them too quickly.

Charlie made a vow to buy Mrs. Hagopian a pomegranate or two at the fruit stand when they come in season….

When he got back to Villa Beach, he sat on his bench, overlooking his now dark great lake, a few night birds were singing, maybe singing the songs of their grandparents.

Write Your Story @ Union City Library

Join our library group, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Third Tuesday of the Month:  July  17 ,   August 21 , and September 18  .                            1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

 

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Celebrate Older American Month 2018…Ageless Soul!

 

“Beautifully and eloquently written…Thomas Moore convinces us that we age best when we embrace our age, live agelessly, and remember every day to find the endless joy nestled inside our soul.”

– Dr. Rudolph E. Tanzi, New York Times b

Bestselling author of Super Brain and Super Genes

Thomas Moore is the renowned author of Care of the Soul, the classic #1 New York Times bestseller. In Ageless Soul, Moore reveals a fresh, uplifting, and inspiring path toward aging, one

that need not be feared, but rather embraced and cherished. In Moore’s view, aging is the process by which one becomes a more distinctive, complex, fulfilled,  loving, and connected person.Using examples from his practice as a psychotherapist and teacher who lectures widely on the soul of medicine and spirituality, Moore argues for a new vision of aging: as a dramatic series of initiations, rather than a diminishing experience, one that each of us has the tools—experience, maturity, fulfillment—to live out. Subjects include:*Why melancholy is a natural part of aging, and how to accept it, rather than confuse it with depression

*The vital role of the elder and mentor in the lives of younger people                                        *The many paths of spiritual growth and learning that open later in life                                             *Sex and sensuality                                         *Building new communities and leaving a legacy

Ageless Soul teaches readers how to     embrace the richness of experience and how to take life on, accept invitations to new vitality, and feel fulfilled as they get older.

 

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Filed under Older Adults, Reading, Uncategorized, Union City Library

STAGEBRIDGE MUSICAL PERFORMANCE@ Union City Library

STAGEBRIDGE 

NEVER TOO LATE

Thursday, May 31, 2018

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

 Join us for Never Too Late, a musical revue featuring songs, outrageous skits, and hilarious strolls down memory lane. Stagebridge showcases the rich and varied experiences of older adults to a multigenerational audience. The program is led by Artistic Director Joanne Grimm and Musical Director Scrumbly Koldwyn on the piano.

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Financial Literacy 101

MSW Primary Logo_2017

April 22 – 29 is Money Smart Week, a national education campaign designed to help consumers better manage their personal finances.

Starting April 22nd, Union City Library will be holding a series of free financial literacy workshops offered by World System Builder as part of their national  financial literacy campaign. From paying for college to planning retirement, the topics covered touch on the many stages and concerns of financial life.  The first session will be an introduction and overview of the series.  Open to all ages.  See the full workshop schedule below:

FinancialLiteracyBanner

Workshop Schedule

April 22nd, Saturday, 12:30 – 1:15 – Introduction

May 17th, Wednesday 6:30 – 7:30 – Debt Management

May 24th, Wednesday 6:30 – 7:30 – Insurance

May 31, Wednesday 6:30 – 7:30 – Investment

June 7th, Wednesday 6:30 – 7:30 – Retirement

June 14th, Wednesday 6:30 – 7:30 – Estate Planning

BookStockMoneyContact the Union City Library’s reference desk for more information at 510-745-1464 (ext. 5).

 

Don’t forget to ask about financial literacy resources provided through your library!  Come visit us at the reference desk or call by phone.

FinancialLitGrowth

More Resources:

MyMoney.gov is website guide developed by the Financial Literacy and Education Commission, focusing on resources for earning, spending, investing, protecting and borrowing money.

360 Degrees of Financial Literacy is a free program provided by the nation’s certified public accountants, which breaks down resources by life stages (student, business owner, retired, parent etc.).

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Dave Rocha Jazz Trio

April 22, 2017      Saturday 3 – 4pm

April is Jazz Appreciation Month, and we invite you for a special celebration at the Union City Library!  Master horn and trumpet player Dave Rocha and his jazz trio will perform jazz standards, pop and show tunes, and original compositions.  The program is free and open to all, no registration required!

DaveRocha

Enjoy some sample tracks below:

A Portrait of Jennie –  A beautiful ballad with flugelhorn, piano, drums and bass.

Let’s Cool One – This unique arrangement alternates between 5/4 and 4/4 time every four measures. It features flugelhorn, piano, drums, and bass.

Sombrero Sam – Some Latin jazz, including trumpet, small Hammond organ, bass and Latin percussion.

You can find the full page of available CD/Audio Samples here.

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Tai Chi for Health

April 22, 2017      Saturday, 1:30 – 2:30

TaiChiSymbolJoin us on April 22nd, Earth Day, for Tai Chi for Health with Beverley Kane, MD.  The session will provide a gentle introduction to this ancient art, suitable for all fitness levels. It will include a brief meditation, qigong silk-reeling exercises, and Tai Chi for Energy forms adapted from the Tai Chi for Health Institute.

No experience is necessary.  For ages 12 and up.  Space is limited.  Please register at the Union City Library’s reference desk or sign up by phone at 510-745-1464 (ext. 5).

TaiChiBK

Beverley Kane, MD, is Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at Stanford Medical School, where she teaches Medical Tai Chi and qigong, the latter with horses. She is certified as an instructor by the Tai Chi for Health Institute.  You can find more information about her work with equine-assisted learning from her website, http://horsensei.com/.

You can find more information about Tai Chi for Health programs, and the history and benefits of tai chi, from the Tai Chi for Health Institute’s website, http://taichiforhealthinstitute.org/what-is-tai-chi/

*This program is part of a monthly exercise series at the Union City Library.  Upcoming sessions include:

– Swing Dancing with Michael Quebec – Saturday May 20th, 3:30 – 4:30

– Gentle Yoga with Dolian Wilson – Saturday, June 17th, 10:15 -11:15

 

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