Category Archives: Uncategorized

Write Your Story…Navigating INDIWORLD

navigating-indiewordlNavigating Indieworld : a beginner’s guide to self-publishing and marketing your book / Julie A. Gerber and Carole P. Roman

Social media guru, Julie A. Gerber and award-winning author of forty-three best-selling, independently published books, Carole P. Roman, team up to travel the winding road of self-publishing, promoting, and marketing a book. Join these two self-help experts as they share their vast store of experience in an easy to read, comprehensive guide, complete with end of chapter checklists to keep an author on track.Learn the importance of a beta reader and the value of a good editor. Know what’s needed when preparing a list for choosing an illustrator. Compare the many ways to promote your book. Find out what each step can cost and where you can save. This guide takes new independent authors from the first draft, through publication and the complicated world of marketing. Included is a directory of resources to help get there faster.Navigating Indieworld will end up being the ultimate travel guide for writers on their journey to published author.

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 February 21 & March 21

April 18

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

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Filed under Events, Friends of the Library, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story…Discover & Go

THE RAMA EPIC:

HERO, HEROINE, ALLY, FOE
Asian Art Museum  free passes are available through Discover & Go program from the Library website 
The exhibition ends JAN 15, 2017

Bloody battles, daring rescues, passionate romance and a shape-shifting monkey warrior.

One of the world’s greatest works of literature, the Rama epic — the 2,500-year-old classic and its many versions — teems with excitement. The story of Prince Rama’s quest to defeat a powerful demonic king, rescue his abducted wife and re-establish order in the world is also, for many, a sacred tradition. For centuries, this beloved tale has been told again and again through visual and performing arts, literature and religious teachings in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and beyond.  

This exhibition invites you to explore the personalities and perspectives of four main characters: Rama; his wife Sita; Rama’s faithful monkey lieutenant Hanuman; and the 10-headed demon king Ravana. Spanning the ancient to the contemporary, this major international survey of 135 artworks captures the epic in a new light. Coursing beneath the drama and fantasy of the thrilling tale, discover timeless human struggles and poignant moments that will resonate with your own story.

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 January 17 & February 21

and March 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please bring pen & paper, or whatever you would like to use when writing.

Union City Library 510-284-0629

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Filed under Events, Links, News, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story…Oil Lamps

Oil Lamps

Submitted by Dennis Smith, Union City Library Member

Oil lamps are another of the many things that young people today are largely ignorant of.  To a lot of people oil lamps are right up there with wind up clocks and phones with a bell in them, curious relics of the past, things they had “back in the day,” whatever that stupid phrase means.  Meaningful statements are fading too, but that is another subject.

I got thinking about oil lamps as I was reflecting on a piece I wrote recently about mantel clocks. There is a connection of sorts between the two. Both were popular and in common use during the same period, and I realized that, for years, right next to my replica mantel clock sat a semi-modern oil lamp.

As I started writing this I had to ask myself, “What can you really say about an oil lamp?” And the answer is, not a lot.  There is really not a lot to be said.  The oil lamp has been around for thousands of years, and have not changed much in the last five hundred,  Oil lamps are not better than other lighting devices, they require some knowledge to use and maintain, and have a few disadvantages.  I like oil lamps but do not want to go back to using them exclusively.

Oil lamps are like mantle clocks, fun to have and know about and maybe it is knowing about them that is important.  But then one day, when the power goes out and the phone batteries dies, and the twenty something set feel cut off form the world, I can light my lamp and check the time on my wind up mantle clock. That might be a good time to read a real book. I think I still have one of those somewhere!

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 January 17 & February 21

and March 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please bring pen & paper, or whatever you would like to use when writing.

Union City Library 510-284-0629

Leave a comment

Filed under Events, News, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story… Doors

The Story Behind a Door

 Submitted by the Union City Library Member Rita K.

At Discover —I recently asked Divyakshi Gupta- a photographer and traveler based in Mumbai — about her obsession with doors:

I often think doors are veils to homes. Each have a distinct character, speaking volumes of the people living behind the door. It’s fun to guess what could possibly be behind a door — an array of secrets, emotions, and mysteries. A home with laughter, heartaches, hopes, banter, and more.

Behind every door is a story, says Divyakshi. I love this thought: that any door you encounter — while walking through your neighborhood or exploring a new place — can lead to a story, an opportunity, or a glimpse into another’s life.

For this Discover Challenge, let’s focus on a door. You’re free to interpret this challenge as you see fit, and respond in any genre or medium, as long as a door — real or imagined — is your primary inspiration. Ideas:

 

▪ Memoirists and nonfiction writers: Tell us about the time you were hesitant to physically enter a building. Share a story about the childhood home you miss. Describe a day when you felt, symbolically, that a door to something new opened, or a door to your past closed.

▪ Short story and fiction writers: Creatively use a door as the main setting of your story. Personify a door in your tale.

▪ Poets: Write a haiku or sonnet — or your preferred poetic form — about a door, or entering or exiting a place or phase in your life.

▪ Photographers: Get inspired by the doors of India captured by Divyakshi, or these doors I’ve photographed on my travels, then get outside and capture your own.

▪ Artists: Draw a door you’ve encountered while out on a walk, illustrate a door in your own home, or sketch a doorway during a museum visit.

For this challenge, the door is wide open.

DOORS:  Insights & Comments

Transition and metamorphosis are the most common ideas represented by the symbol of the door; it is a passage from one place to another, between different states, between lightness and darkness. According to Julien, the act of passing over the threshold signifies that one must leave behind his materialism and personality to confront inner silence and meditation. It is abandoning the old and embracing the new; an open door signifies welcome and invites discovery and investigation, while a closed door represents rejection, protection, secrecy, exclusion, and imprisonment.

Is a feminine symbol in connection with the hole that it leads to, the vagina; the antithesis of the wall. Doors hold the essence of mystery, separating two distinct areas, keeping things apart. They are a barrier, a boundary, which must be negotiated, before the threshold can be crossed. The mysterious beyond is hidden from sight by the closed door, and some sort of action must be taken before the other side becomes visible and available to us. The closed door is full of potential, for anything might lie beyond, as yet unknown and unseen. Yet the closed door may also be limiting, preventing us ever gaining access to its hidden contents.

Sometimes gaining access may be as simple as approaching and turning the handle, but perhaps the door is locked. Then we need to knock or ring the bell and negotiate with the guardian or keeper of the door. Saying the right words, or holding the correct credentials will then secure our passage. This theme recurrs in countless fairytales and myths, from Ali Baba to Cuchulin. Belonging to the club or group which lies within, or paying the doorkeeper might also secure passage, but some doors remain stubbornly closed, unless you hold the key.

The doors may remain closed to protect those who live within, or to maintain a secret, or to keep a space sacred and to keep out the profane. These nunnery doors are heavily fortified, and their protective powers are boosted by the stone guardians watching from above. Lions, bulls and flames are frequent guardian symbols found on and around doors, adding to the protective qualities of the barrier.

So when we face a closed door, we face a choice. What action will we take? Will we turn back defeated by the barrier,or will we push forwards and attempt to gain access? The nature of the door itself, and its guardians may well shape our choice, helping us decide if we will feel comfortable with what lies beyond. The symbolism of a door closing on us, is one of an opportunity fading, of a potential now lost to us.. That way no longer lies open to us without negotiation and effort.

The symbolism of a door opening to us, is one of exciting new potential. The block which stood before us has now been removed and we are free to move forwards, and to cross the threshold into something new. We are invited forwards into change, with nothing to negotiate except the transition of one place to another. The guardian of the threshold is welcoming us forwards. Change beckons us with open arms.

So the door is protective guarding the doorway, denying or allowing passage through from one place or one state to another. The symbolism of the door is closely bound with the symbols of doorways and thresholds, and of keys and locks, hinges and handles, bells and guardians. The door itself either allows movement forwards or prevents it, and in this way we can see the door as a symbol of duality, as it is either closed or open, locked or unlocked.

SYMBOLISM OF DOORS

Doors hold the essence of mystery, separating two distinct areas, keeping things apart. They are a barrier, a boundary, which must be negotiated, before the threshold can be crossed. The mysterious beyond is hidden from sight by the closed door, and some sort of action must be taken before the other side becomes visible and available to us. The closed door is full of potential, for anything might lie beyond, as yet unknown and unseen. Yet the closed door may also be limiting, preventing us ever gaining access to its hidden contents.

Sometimes gaining access may be as simple as approaching and turning the handle, but perhaps the door is locked. Then we need to knock or ring the bell and negotiate with the guardian or keeper of the door. Saying the right words, or holding the correct credentials will then secure our passage. This theme recurrs in countless fairytales and myths, from Ali Baba to Cuchulin. Belonging to the club or group which lies within, or paying the doorkeeper might also secure passage, but some doors remain stubbornly closed, unless you hold the key.

The doors may remain closed to protect those who live within, or to maintain a secret, or to keep a space sacred and to keep out the profane. These nunnery doors are heavily fortified, and their protective powers are boosted by the stone guardians watching from above. Lions, bulls and flames are frequent guardian symbols found on and around doors, adding to the protective qualities of the barrier.

When we face a closed door, we face a choice. What action will we take? Will we turn back defeated by the barrier,or will we push forwards and attempt to gain access? The nature of the door itself, and its guardians may well shape our choice, helping us decide if we will feel comfortable with what lies beyond. The symbolism of a door closing on us, is one of an opportunity fading, of a potential now lost to us.. That way no longer lies open to us without negotiation and effort.

Symbolism of a door opening to us, is one of exciting new potential. The block which stood before us has now been removed and we are free to move forwards, and to cross the threshold into something new. We are invited forwards into change, with nothing to negotiate except the transition of one place to another. The guardian of the threshold is welcoming us forwards. Change beckons us with open arms.

So the door is protective guarding the doorway, denying or allowing passage through from one place or one state to another. The symbolism of the door is closely bound with the symbols of doorways and thresholds, and of keys and locks, hinges and handles, bells and guardians. The door itself either allows movement forwards or prevents it, and in this way we can see the door as a symbol of duality, as it is either closed or open, locked or unlocked.

The root of the English word door lies in the Sanskrit word Duarah, which means two doors or gates. From this comes the Greek Thura, the German Tur, Middle English Dure or Dor, Old Norse Dyrr and these all mean door. We also find the Gaulish Doro which means mouth, giving us an interesting image of the lips as double doors to our mouths and the words beyond. A guarded way in and out of our bodies.

Write Your Story

@

the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 November 15 & December 20

and January 17

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please  bring pen & paper

Union City Library 510-284-0629

 

 

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Filed under Events, Links, Older Adults, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Today is the day to VOTE!

Don’t know your polling place? Check here

Did you vote by mail or drop off your ballot early and want to know if it was received? Check here

Make your vote count! Your vote is important!

Image result for vote free clip art

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Filed under Events, Older Adults, Teens, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month @ Union City Library

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by | Wednesday, October, 12, 2016 · 12:58 pm

Better Choices, Better Health Workshop Series

location-date-timeBCBHPic

Are you interested in tools to help you or someone you love manage a chronic condition and live a healthier life? Better Choices, Better Health is a free series of health workshops for anyone dealing with a chronic health condition like diabetes, asthma, COPD, heart disease, depression, or high cholesterol. Come to this Stanford University-developed class to learn about mental and physical health in a supportive environment and gain the tools to help you achieve your personal health goals!  More information about the program, its origins and research on its benefits, can be found on Stanford’s website and The Health Trust’s website.

Those who attend these interactive workshop will get a toolbox of skills including:

  • Dealing with pain and fatigue and frustration
  • Weight management
  • How to get a good night’s sleep
  • Communicating with family, friends and health professionals
  • How to read food labels and improve nutrition
  • Decision making and goal setting
  • Communicating with family, friends and health professionals

***Refreshments will be provided

The class meets for six weeks staring Oct. 8th, and participants must join by the second week at latest.  All meetings are Saturdays 10:30am-1:00pm. After completing at least four sessions, you will receive a free textbook and relaxation CD as part of the course.

Register online or call 408-961-9877 to register.   You may also register by phone or in person at the Union City Library Reference Desk (510-745-1464, ext. 5).

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Filed under Events, Older Adults, Uncategorized, Union City Library