Tag Archives: Animals

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for January 2, 2017

darkest-darkThe Darkest Dark by Astronaut Chris Hadfield

“Young Chris loves pretending he’s a brave astronaut, exploring the universe. Only one problem–at night, he’s afraid of the dark. Only when he watches the moon landing on TV does he realize how exciting the unknown can be. Inspired by the childhood of real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield.”                 [JPB HADFIELD]

paddington-plays-onPaddington Plays On by Michael Bond

“Paddington is having a wonderful time while on vacation with the Browns in a small French town. He loves exploring and meeting new friends. So how exactly does he end up marching through town as a drummer in the local band? Sure he can keep the beat on the drum. But can keep up with the band?”                 [JE BOND,M]

big-wishBig Wish by Brandon Robshaw

“When a shooting star grants Sam a million wishes (as long as they are logically possible) he thinks that he will be able to make his life better at his new school–but he soon learns that you have to be very careful, because wishes can have unexpected consequences.”     [J ROBSHAW,B]

animal-atlasAnimal Atlas by James Buckley, Jr.

“Animal Planet’s definitive atlas of animal life takes readers on a continent-by-continent and habitat-by-habitat passport to adventure! Meet fierce snow leopards in the Tibetan mountains, giant helicopter damselflies in the rain forests of Central America, majestic eagles in the temperate forests of North America, and hundreds more fascinating creatures. What is a habitat? How is the North Pole’s animal life different from the South Pole’s? How and why do animals adapt to their environment? Is a food web different from a food chain? Animal Planet Animal Atlas answers all these questions and more in a kid-friendly, accessible format that young readers, parents, teachers, and librarians will adore.”             [J590 BUCKLEY]

 

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for December 5, 2016

pearl-harbour-largeThis Wednesday, December 7, is the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the event which led directly to the entry of the United States into World War II.

same-same-but-differentSame, Same But Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw

“Elliot lives in America, and Kailash lives in India. They are pen pals. By exchanging letters and pictures, they learn that they both love to climb trees, have pets, and go to school. Their worlds might look different, but they are actually similar. Same, same. But different!”         [JPB KOSTECKI-SHAW,J]

beautiful-blue-worldBeautiful Blue World by Suzanne LaFleur

“At twelve, Mathilde Joss is the oldest child in a loving family. Her country has been at war for years, and bombing and food shortages continue to increase. When the army announces that children over twelve can take a test to be chosen to serve their country, and that the relatives of children who serve will be well paid, Mathilde decides to take the test to help her family, even though she knows that it is her brilliant best friend Megs who will be selected.

“What follows is a gripping and suspenseful reimagining of war, where even kindness can be a weapon, and children have the power to see what adults cannot. It is as heartwarming as it is heartbreaking.”         [J LAFLEUR,S]

paxPax by Sara Pennypacker

“Pax and Peter have been inseparable ever since Peter rescued him as a kit. But one day, the unimaginable happens: Peter’s dad enlists in the military and makes him return the fox to the wild.

“At his grandfather’s house, three hundred miles away from home, Peter knows he isn’t where he should be—with Pax. He strikes out on his own despite the encroaching war, spurred by love, loyalty, and grief, to be reunited with his fox.

“Meanwhile Pax, steadfastly waiting for his boy, embarks on adventures and discoveries of his own. . . .”      [J PENNYPACKER,S]

boy-and-a-jaguarA Boy and a Jaguar by Alan Rabinowitz

“Alan loves animals, but the great cat house at the Bronx Zoo makes him sad. Why are they all alone in empty cages? Are they being punished? More than anything, he wants to be their champion—their voice—but he stutters uncontrollably.

“Except when he talks to animals…    Then he is fluent.

“Follow the life of the man Time Magazine calls, ‘the Indiana Jones of wildlife conservation’ as he searches for his voice and fulfills a promise to speak for animals, and people, who cannot speak for themselves.”                                [JB RABINOWITZ,A]

blood-brotherBlood Brother: Jonathan Daniels and His Sacrifice for Civil Rights by Rich Wallace and Sandra Neil Wallace

“Jonathan Daniels, a white seminary student from New Hampshire, traveled to Selma, Alabama, in 1965 to help with voter registration of black residents. After the voting rights marches, he remained in Alabama, in the area known as Bloody Lowndes, an extremely dangerous area for white freedom fighters, to assist civil rights workers. Five months later, Jonathan Daniels was shot and killed while saving the life of Ruby Sales, a black teenager. Through Daniels’s poignant letters, papers, photographs, and taped interviews, authors Rich Wallace and Sandra Neil Wallace explore what led Daniels to the moment of his death, the trial of his murderer, and how these events helped reshape both the legal and political climate of Lowndes County and the nation.”                     [ JB DANIELS,J]

complete-photo-guide-to-knittingComplete Photo Guide to Knitting by Mary Scott Huff

Creative Kids Complete Photo Guide to Knitting starts with the absolute basics about knitting, beginning with a discussion about needles and yarn, how to cast stitches onto the needle, then gradually introduces skills and techniques until kids are knitting confidently.

“Mary Scott Huff will guide you  through projects. With over 200 photos and clear, concise instructions in language easily understood by grade-school kids, you’re going to be creating crafty knit projects in no time!

“Each project lists the knitting skills that will be exercised in making it and projects are rated for difficulty, so kids can learn and grow as they develop dexterity and coordination. You will learn to knit by making simple projects and building skills by practicing the essentials, and this book provides a sound foundation for a lifetime of knitting enjoyment.”      [J746.432 HUFF]

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for May 9, 2016

traveling butterfliesTraveling Butterflies by Susumu Shingu

“Monarch butterfly migration is one of nature’s great mysteries. How do monarchs manage to fly some 2,500 miles from Canada and the northern United States south to Mexico? How do they trace a route they’ve never flown and reach the same destination their ancestors once found? Rich illustrations in a vibrant color palette bring the butterflies to life and depict the rural and urban landscapes through which they fly.”                [JPB SHINGU,S]

charmed childrenThe Charmed Children of Rookskill Castle by Janet Fox

“’Keep calm and carry on.

“That’s what Katherine Bateson’s father told her, and that’s what she’s trying to do: when her father goes off to the war, when her mother sends Kat and her brother and sister away from London to escape the incessant bombing, even when the children arrive at Rookskill Castle, an ancient, crumbling manor on the misty Scottish highlands.

“But it’s hard to keep calm in the strange castle that seems haunted by ghosts or worse. What’s making those terrifying screeches and groans at night? Why do the castle’s walls seem to have a mind of their own? And why do people seem to mysteriously appear and disappear?

“Kat believes she knows the answer: Lady Eleanor, who rules Rookskill Castle, is harboring a Nazi spy. But when her classmates begin to vanish, one by one, Kat must uncover the truth about what the castle actually harbors—and who Lady Eleanor really is—before it’s too late.”         [J FOX,J]

wild robotThe Wild Robot by Peter Brown

“When robot Roz opens her eyes for the first time, she discovers that she is alone on a remote, wild island. Why is she there? Where did she come from? And, most important, how will she survive in her harsh surroundings? Roz’s only hope is to learn from the island’s hostile animal inhabitants. When she tries to care for an orphaned gosling, the other animals finally decide to help, and the island starts to feel like home. Until one day, the robot’s mysterious past comes back to haunt her….

“Heartwarming and full of action, Peter Brown’s middle-grade debut raises thought-provoking questions about the environment, the role technology plays in our world, and what it means to be alive.”         [J BROWN,P]

star wars rebels visual guideStar Wars Rebels Visual Guide: Epic Battles by Adam Bray

“A fact-filled companion to the first and second series of the newest Star Wars animated television series. Star Wars Rebels™ is set between the events of Episodes III and IV, and The Visual Guide depicts all the galactic escapades, interesting vehicles, and fun characters fans have come to love.”           [J791.4572 BRAY]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for April 18, 2016

everybody sleeps butEverybody Sleeps (But Not Fred) by Josh Schneider

“Every kind of bird and beast has to sleep, from the monkeys in the jungle to the whales in the ocean to the ants under the ground.

“But not Fred. His to-do list is far too long! Armed with plenty of imagination, this determined little boy and his attempts to resist bedtime are sure to strike a chord with today’s over scheduled families. Drowsy animals of all stripes look on in disbelief as Fred keeps on going and going and going, until . . .

“Could it be that, after so much activity, even Fred needs to rest? Shhh. Close the book softly, and please let Fred sleep.”                            [JPB SCHNEIDER,J]

unicorn hunterThe Unicorn Hunter by Che Golden

“‘Gripping, mystical and adventurous, young readers will be as hooked as Maddy was the minute she set foot inside that creepy-as-hell old castle,’ raved Irish World said of The Feral Child.

“Maddy’s adventures continue in The Unicorn Hunter. The adults of Blarney have always lived in fear. The faeries of Tir na nOg exist on their doorstep, and they could unleash terror on the mortal realm at any time.

“But eleven-year-old Maddy is not afraid. The unicorn that holds the key to balance and peace in both worlds is injured, and Maddy knows she is the only one who can track down whoever hurt her.

“Can Maddy survive the force and cunning of the Tuatha, who rule Tir na nOg? Or will she end up a mere pawn in their own power games?” The trilogy concludes with The Raven Queen.            [J GOLDEN,C]

investigating the water cycleInvestigating the Water Cycle by Candice Ransom

“Water is essential to life on our planet. Water is constantly moving between Earth’s surface, the air, and the ground. But did you know that water cannot be created or destroyed? Or that water is not only a liquid but also a solid and a gas? See the water cycle in action in this fascinating book.”           [J551.48 RANSOM,C]

brain gamesBrain Games: The Mind-Blowing Science of Your Amazing Brain by Jennifer Swanson

“QUICK: Name the most powerful and complex supercomputer ever built. Give up? Here’s a hint: It’s housed in your head and it’s the one thing that makes you YOU. Your brain is mission control for the rest of your body and steers you through life. Not bad for something the size of a softball that looks like a wrinkled grey sponge! In this fascinating, interactive book — a companion to the National Geographic Channel hit show – kids explore the parts of the brain and how it all works, brainy news nuggets from a neuroscientist, plus fun facts and crazy challenges.”                        [J612.82 SWANSON,J]

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for March 7, 2016

bea in the nutcrackerBea in the Nutcracker by Rachel Isadora

“Bea and her friends are excited to put on their costumes and dance onstage in The Nutcracker! Bea is going to be Clara, and Sam is going to be the Prince. They will dance in the ballet’s magical Land of Sweets. Yum!”              [JPB ISADORA,R]

lily and bearLily and the Bear by Lisa Stubbs

“Lily likes nothing better than to imagine and draw the things she loves. She draws cats and birds and boats and houses, and one day she makes a very special drawing of a bear who comes to life. Lily shows Bear her favorite things, and Bear shows Lily his—because everyone knows that friends help friends see the world in a new way. That’s why Lily and Bear are forever friends!”     [JPB STUBBS]

one bear extraordinaireOne Bear Extraordinaire by Jayme McGowan

“Bear wakes up one morning with a song in his head, but something is missing. What’s a one-bear band to do? He travels the forest in search of his song and meets a few other musicians along the way, but even with their help, his song still feels incomplete. Will Bear find the perfect accompaniment and learn that every song sounds sweeter with friends by his side?”                    [JPB McGOWAN,J]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for February 8, 2016

1-2-3 zooborns1-2-3 Zooborns! by Andrew Bleiman

“Combines endearing animal photos with bouncy text and a fact-filled glossary in a number-themed primer that encourages young children to practice early counting skills.”                    [JPB BLEIMAN]

book of beastsThe Book of Beasts by John Barrowman and Carole E. Barrowman

“Matt and Emily Calder’s travels through time come to a thrilling conclusion in the third book of the Hollow Earth trilogy as the siblings struggle to close Hollow Earth—and keep the monsters inside.

“Twins Matt and Emily Calder may be divided by time, but they are united in their mission to close Hollow Earth before the monsters inside can destroy the world. The key to success lies with their Animare talents: they can draw things into life and travel in time through art. But there are monsters outside Hollow Earth as well. Monsters intent on taking control of the beasts for themselves. And the worst monster of all is their own father…”                              [J BARROWMAN]

iron railsIron Rails, Iron Men, and the Race to Link the Nation: The Story of the Transcontinental Railroad by Martin W. Sandler

“Experience the race of rails to link the country—and meet the men behind this incredible feat—in a riveting story about the building of the transcontinental railroad, brought to life with archival photos.

“In the 1850s, gold fever swept the West, but people had to walk, sail, or ride horses for months on end to seek their fortune. The question of faster, safer transportation was posed by national leaders. But with 1,800 miles of seemingly impenetrable mountains, searing deserts, and endless plains between the Missouri River and San Francisco, could a transcontinental railroad be built? It seemed impossible. Eventually, two railroad companies, the Central Pacific, which laid the tracks eastward, and the Union Pacific, which moved west, began the job. In one great race between iron men with iron wills, tens of thousands of workers blasted the longest tunnels that had ever been constructed, built the highest bridges that had ever been created, and finally linked the nation by two bands of steel, changing America forever.”                     [J385.0978 SANDLER]

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for October 19, 2015

fine dessert A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat by Emily Jenkins and Sophie Blackall

“In 1710, a girl and her mother in Lyme, England, prepare a blackberry fool, picking wild blackberries and beating cream from their cow with a bundle of twigs. The same dessert is prepared by a slave girl and her mother in 1810 in Charleston, South Carolina; by a mother and daughter in 1910 in Boston; and finally by a boy and his father in present-day San Diego.

“In this fascinating picture book, four families, in four different cities, over four centuries, make the same delicious dessert: blackberry fool. This richly detailed book ingeniously shows how food, technology, and even families have changed throughout American history. Kids and parents alike will delight in discovering the differences in daily life over the course of four centuries.

“Includes a recipe for blackberry fool and notes from the author and illustrator about their research.”     [JPB JENKINS]

me and my big mouthMe and My Big Mouth by Jeff Anderson

“Zack Delacruz is unnoticed at his middle school—and that’s just the way he likes it. But a school assembly, a typhoon of spit, and an uncharacteristic moment of bravery are all it takes to change everything. Suddenly Zack is in charge of the class fundraiser. Worse, his partner is the school’s biggest bully! If they don’t sell all the chocolate bars, there will be no dance for the sixth grade. Zack never wanted to be a hero, but with his classmates’ hopes on the line, can he save the day?”                   [J ANDERSON,J]

anywhere but paradise Anywhere But Paradise by Anne Bustard

“It’s 1960 and Peggy Sue has just been transplanted from Texas to Hawaii for her father’s new job. Her cat, Howdy, is stuck in animal quarantine, and she’s baffled by Hawaiian customs and words. Worst of all, eighth grader Kiki Kahana targets Peggy Sue because she is haole–white–warning her that unless she does what Kiki wants, she will be a victim on ‘kill haole day,’ the last day of school. Peggy Sue’s home ec teacher insists that she help Kiki with her sewing project or risk failing. Life looks bleak until Peggy Sue meets Malina, whose mother gives hula lessons.

“But when her parents take a trip to Hilo, leaving Peggy Sue at Malina’s, life takes an unexpected twist in the form of a tsunami. Peggy Sue is knocked unconscious and wakes to learn that her parents safety and whereabouts are unknown. Peggy Sue has to summon all her courage to have hope that they will return safely.”         [J BUSTARD,A]

book of animal recordsBook of Animal Records by Mark Carwardine

“Here are the achievers and the unique from the animal world: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes and invertebrates. These are not only familiar records like highest, fastest, largest, these are the unusual, such as slowest growth (the deep sea clam), most pecks in a day (black woodpecker), noisiest bird (booming Kakapo) and worst climber (western fence lizards fall out of their oak tree homes about 12,000 times a year).

“There are myth-busters — centipedes have the most legs, not millipedes, and fascinating stories — two “dead” specimens of desert snail were glued onto a museum display tablet only to come out of hibernation four years later. There is a lot of the bizarre (horned lizards from western North America can squirt blood from their eyes) and the ingenious (humpback whales use bubbles as fishing nets).

“Natural History Museum Book of Animal Records includes almost 900 records that show the diversity and wonder of the animal kingdom.”                             [J590 CARWARDINE,M]

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