Tag Archives: ducks

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for August 24, 2015

room for bear Room For Bear by Ciara Gavin

“Waking up in the springtime and embarking on a search for a new home, Bear finds a perfect place with the family of five little ducks despite being rather too large to fit in.

“Can five little ducks find room for one big bear in their home—and in their hearts?”       [JPB GAVIN]

work and more work Work and More Work by Linda Little and Oscar T. Perez

“Tom lives in the countryside in the mid 1800s, and he’s curious what is it like in the town, the city, and the world beyond? ‘It’s all work and more work,’ everyone tells him. Determined to find out for himself, Tom sets off with a bit of bread and cheese in a bundle . . . He encounters crowded marketplaces, bustling wharves, and storms on the high seas. In China he sees how tea is made; in India he watches men make deep blue dye from indigo; in Ceylon he marvels at the skill of cinnamon peelers. Eventually he returns home with stories and gifts, showing his parents the riches to be found all over the world. This wonderful book includes an illustrated afterword about the different kinds of work mentioned in the story, work that was done when, in the days before steam, nothing moved except through the power of wind, water, and muscle.”       [JPB LITTLE,L]

fort Fort by Cynthia DeFelice

“In this boys-will-be-boys summer story about friendship and revenge, eleven-year-old Wyatt and his friend Augie aren’t looking for a fight. They’re having the best summer of their lives hanging out in the fort they built in the woods, fishing and hunting, cooking over a campfire, and sleeping out. But when two older boys mess with the fort–and with another kid who can’t fight back–the friends are forced to launch Operation Doom, with unexpected results for all concerned, in this novel about two funny and very real young heroes.”                     [J DEFELICE,C]

tortoise and the hareThe Tortoise and the Hare: an Aesop Fable retold and illustrated by Bernadette Watts

“A classic re-envisioned and retold by Bernadette Watts—one of Europe’s most recognized and beloved fairy-tale artists! When Tortoise says to Hare, ‘I bet I can beat you in a running race!’ everyone laughs. Tortoise puts one foot in front of the next. Hare stops to nibble carrot tops and cabbages. . . . Who will have the last laugh? ‘The Hare and the Tortoise‘ has been a favorite with generations of children around the world. Bernadette Watts’s lovable animals and sumptuous settings bring great warmth and charm to this timeless tale. Little listeners will celebrate anew with all the animals at the finish line!”                                 [J398.2452 WATTS]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for April 27, 2015

10 little rubber ducks10 Little Rubber Ducks by Eric Carle

“Based on a true story, an amusing tale tells about ten rubber ducks who, after being tossed overboard a ship during a storm, find themselves floating alone on the high seas–reaching lands and meeting people far away from their original destination.”             [JPB CARLE,E]

square cat abcSquare Cat ABC by Elizabeth Schoonmaker

“Each letter of the alphabet tells the story of an adorable mouse who discovers Eula, a hip-yet-square cat, in her garden. Mouse wants a taste of his favorite vegetable, spinach, but our four-sided feline hates the green leafy stuff. Enter the threatening, pointed quills of a porcupine, and Mouse is ready to run! One letter leads to another and by the story’s end, Mouse and Porcupine are pals—and Eula might even try a taste of zesty spinach.”             [JPB  SCHOONMAKER,E]

bo at iditarod creekBo at Iditarod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill

“Ever since five-year-old Bo can remember, she and her papas have lived in the little Alaskan mining town of Ballard Creek. Now the family must move upriver to Iditarod Creek for work at a new mine, and Bo is losing the only home she’s ever known. Initially homesick, she soon realizes that there is warmth and friendship to be found everywhere . . . and what’s more, her new town may hold an unexpected addition to her already unconventional family.

“This stand-alone sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek  is a story about love, inclusion, and day-to-day living in the rugged Alaskan bush of the late 1920s. Full of fascinating details, it is an unforgettable story.”      [J HILL,K]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for February 23, 2015

Sorry I haven’t been around for a while; stay healthy!!! Here are some interesting new books for you.

just a duckJust a Duck? by Carin Bramsen

“Carin Bramsen’s beloved Hey, Duck! characters return in this humorous and heartwarming picture book about friendship. Now that Cat has learned to play games that Duck enjoys, it’s Duck’s turn to try things that Cat likes. However, climbing trees and swatting at leaves prove to be a bit tricky for flat-footed Duck. What’s an unlikely pair of friends to do?”                  [JPB BRAMSEN]

finding serendipityFinding Serendipity by Angelica Banks

“When Tuesday McGillycuddy and her beloved dog, Baxterr, discover that Tuesday’s mother—the famous author Serendipity Smith—has gone missing, they set out on a magical adventure. In their quest to find Serendipity, they discover the mysterious and unpredictable place that stories come from. Here, Tuesday befriends the fearless Vivienne Small, learns to sail an enchanted boat, tangles with an evil pirate, and discovers the truth about her remarkable dog. Along the way, she learns what it means to be a writer and how difficult it can sometimes be to get all the way to The End.”         [J BANKS]

vikingworldVikingworld: The Age of Seafarers and Sagas by Robert MacLeod

“Set sail on a voyage of discovery! For 300 years, the Vikings spread terror across Europe, and this lavish volume brings the notorious Norsemen to axe-wielding life. Through awe-inspiring CGI scenes, intricate illustrations, maps, and a timeline,Vikingworld animates everything from seafaring and sagas, to raiding and religion, to feasting and fun. It’s sure to stir the imagination of every would-be warrior.”               [J948.022 MACLEOD]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for March 3, 2014

Lost Cat by C. Roger Mader

“When Slipper is accidentally left behind, her journey begins. Luckily, everyone wants to be with her. But Slipper won’t settle for just any home—she’s determined to find the family that fits! Roger Mader creates a story for all who believe in happily ever after.”                       [JPB MADER]

On an American Day, Volume 1: Story Voyages Through History 1750-1899 by Rona Arato

“What better way for young readers to truly understand another era than to spend a day in the life of another child? On an American Day Volume 1 uses nine extraordinary pieces of historical fiction covering American history from 1750-1899 to give young readers an intimate look at life in another place and time, beginning with the story of Patrick, an Irish-Catholic immigrant seeking relief from religious persecution in Pennsylvania in 1755. From there, readers meet more characters living through historic events like the Revolutionary and Civil wars, and the Johnstown flood; through civil rights milestones like the Emancipation Proclamation; and through national achievements like the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad and the opening of the Perkins School for the Blind. The book ends at the turn of the 20th century with the founding of Hull House in Chicago.”   [J ARATO]

Odd Duck by Cecil Castelluci and Sara Varon

“Theodora is a perfectly normal duck. She may swim with a teacup balanced on her head and stay north when the rest of the ducks fly south for the winter, but there’s nothing so odd about that.

“Chad, on the other hand, is one strange bird. Theodora quite likes him, but she can’t overlook his odd habits. It’s a good thing Chad has a normal friend like Theodora to set a good example for him.

“But who exactly is the odd duck here? Theodora may not like the answer.”     [J741.5973 CASTELLUCCI]

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