Tag Archives: Eric Carle

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for April 11, 2016

loe from the very hungryLove From the Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

“You are the cherry on my cake; you make the sun shine brighter; you make my heart flutter.” Using a range of images from the World of Eric Carle, and featuring the Very Hungry Caterpillar, this special gift book gives all the reasons why someone special makes the world a better and brighter place. Perfect for that someone special on Valentine’s Day—or any day.”               [JPB CARLE,E]

in the footstepsIn The Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall III

“Jimmy McClean is a Lakota boy—though you wouldn’t guess it by his name: his father is part white and part Lakota, and his mother is Lakota. When he embarks on a journey with his grandfather, Nyles High Eagle, he learns more and more about his Lakota heritage—in particular, the story of Crazy Horse, one of the most important figures in Lakota and American history. Drawing references and inspiration from the oral stories of the Lakota tradition, celebrated author Joseph Marshall III juxtaposes the contemporary story of Jimmy with an insider’s perspective on the life of Tasunke Witko, better known as Crazy Horse (c. 1840–1877). The book follows the heroic deeds of the Lakota leader who took up arms against the US federal government to fight against encroachments on the territories and way of life of the Lakota people, including leading a war party to victory at the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Along with Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse was the last of the Lakota to surrender his people to the US army. Through his grandfather’s tales about the famous warrior, Jimmy learns more about his Lakota heritage and, ultimately, himself.”       [J MARSHALL,J]

sex, pubertySex, Puberty and All That Stuff: A Guide to Growing Up by Jacqui Bailey

“This friendly book talks to teens on the subject that is first and foremost in the minds of adolescent boys and girls: Sex. Separate chapters titled Boy Stuff and Girl Stuff describe body changes that occur during puberty, with frank and open discussions about male and female genitals, how they feel, and how they function. Chapters that follow discuss typical teen problems, as well as those entirely new feelings that come with sexual development, and offer tips on making it through those sometimes exciting, sometimes crazy teen years. Learn how to deal with crushes, controlling parents, pimples, kissing, dating, hormones, menstruation, sexual activity, condoms, contraception, pregnancy, STDs, sexual impulses, and more. New to this edition is information on social networks, protecting yourself online, maintaining a positive body image, mental health, sexual orientation, gender identity, and more. Includes line drawings on most pages.”           [J613.951 BAILEY,J]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for April 27, 2015

10 little rubber ducks10 Little Rubber Ducks by Eric Carle

“Based on a true story, an amusing tale tells about ten rubber ducks who, after being tossed overboard a ship during a storm, find themselves floating alone on the high seas–reaching lands and meeting people far away from their original destination.”             [JPB CARLE,E]

square cat abcSquare Cat ABC by Elizabeth Schoonmaker

“Each letter of the alphabet tells the story of an adorable mouse who discovers Eula, a hip-yet-square cat, in her garden. Mouse wants a taste of his favorite vegetable, spinach, but our four-sided feline hates the green leafy stuff. Enter the threatening, pointed quills of a porcupine, and Mouse is ready to run! One letter leads to another and by the story’s end, Mouse and Porcupine are pals—and Eula might even try a taste of zesty spinach.”             [JPB  SCHOONMAKER,E]

bo at iditarod creekBo at Iditarod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill

“Ever since five-year-old Bo can remember, she and her papas have lived in the little Alaskan mining town of Ballard Creek. Now the family must move upriver to Iditarod Creek for work at a new mine, and Bo is losing the only home she’s ever known. Initially homesick, she soon realizes that there is warmth and friendship to be found everywhere . . . and what’s more, her new town may hold an unexpected addition to her already unconventional family.

“This stand-alone sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek  is a story about love, inclusion, and day-to-day living in the rugged Alaskan bush of the late 1920s. Full of fascinating details, it is an unforgettable story.”      [J HILL,K]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for January 13, 2014

Friends written and illustrated by Eric Carle

“From the creator of the all-time classic VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR comes a sweetly resonant story about the power of friendship.

“When a best friend moves away, it can be painful for the child who is left behind. But the spunky boy in this upbeat story makes up his mind to find his missing playmate. Young readers will cheer on the boy as he braves currents, climbs mountains, and dashes through rain before, finally, reuniting with his friend. A story alive with love and perseverance, brightened with vibrant art and Eric Carle’s trademark fostering of imagination.”               [JPB CARLE]

Numbed by David Lubar

“When Logan’s class takes a trip to a math museum, his mischievous friend Benedict is sure it will be a boring day—until he discovers a robot and its creator in an off-limits area. The robot proves feisty, and soon both boys get zapped. They realize only later that they’d left the museum without their math skills. To get back the knowledge they need for school—not to mention buying food at the mall, divvying up dinner at home, and much more—they’ll have to get back to the museum and pass a series of math challenges. Being ‘numbed’ will teach Logan and Benedict just how useful, and even fun, math can be.”         [J LUBAR]

Just Joking 4 by Rosie Gowsell Pattison

“The fourth book in this successful series delivers 300 new laugh-out-loud knock-knocks, question-and-answer jokes, tongue twisters, and more! National Geographic Kids Just Joking 4 is packed with 300 more of the silly jokes that kids love, paired with photos of laughing animals and funny people.”               [J818.602 PATTISON]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for July 1, 2013

Round is a Tortilla: A Book of Shapes by Roseanne Greenfield Thong

“Children are invited to discover a world of shapes on lively, colorful spreads that feature a busy Latino family and culturally evocative objects ranging from rectangle ice-cream carts and stone metates to triangle slices of watermelon and quesadillas,”            [JPB THONG]

Rooster is Off to See the World by Eric Carle

“Count along with Rooster in this Ready-to-Read edition of a favorite story from Eric Carle. One fine morning, a rooster sets off to see the world. Soon he’s joined by two cats, then three frogs, then four turtles, then five fish. But one group by one, his new friends decide to head home, leaving the rooster alone again—and ready to return to his own comfortable home as well.”  [JE CARLE]

A Wish in the Woods by Beth Bracken and Kay Fraser

“Wishes are more than words. For as long as they can remember, Soli and Lucy have been coming to Willow Forest. They are warned to stay out of the woods, told that it’s a faerieground where anything can happen. It’s a dark, magical, beautiful place, and they love the solitude and beauty of the forest. They played there as little girls; now as young women they dream and talk there.

“But when Lucy betrays Soli, the woods become the stage for their argument. And though Lucy knows how dangerous it can be to wish in the woods, Soli doesn’t believe in faeries….”              [J BRACKEN]

Planet Ark: Preserving Earth’s Biodiversity by Adrienne Mason

“Young readers can learn how to be modern-day Noahs and protect the world’s plants and animals from extinction not by building a giant boat, but by making small changes in their everyday lives — from planting trees to turning off the tap — to help preserve the world’s biodiversity. Planet Ark is part of CitizenKid, a collection of books that inform children about the world and inspire them to be better global citizens.”                    [J577 MASON]

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