Tag Archives: families

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for February 6, 2017

dark-dark-caveA Dark, Dark Cave by Eric Hoffman

“On a cold night, under a pale moon, a brother and sister explore a dark, dark cave. Strange creatures skitter along the walls while bats brush past. A wild howl makes the cave feel just a teensy bit darker. But readers are in for a delightful surprise when a beam of light reveals a softer side of the cave.”                    [JPB HOFFMAN]

my-dad-at-the-zooMy Dad at the Zoo by Coralie Saudo

“The long-awaited follow up to My Dad Is Big and Strong, My Dad at the Zoo, is another tale of role reversal in which dad reverts to the unsocialized, wild ways of childhood. Probably tired from all of his wearying antics around bedtime, here Dad heads off to the zoo with his son and goes completely zany.”             [JPB SAUDO]

my-dogs-a-chickenMy Dog’s a Chicken by Susan McElroy Montanari

“Lula Mae wants a puppy, but times are hard and she’ll just have to make do. Her family has plenty of chickens, so she decides maybe a chicken can be a dog.

“Pookie, as Lula Mae names her, is an ordinary chicken, but Lula Mae thinks she is very doglike indeed. With a bow in Pookie’s hair, Lula Mae declares her a show dog. When she runs circles around the other chickens, Pookie is a shepherd dog. And when Cousin Tater sneaks up with a snake and Pookie starts bawk, bawk, bawking, well, she’s a guard dog, too. Then Lula Mae’s brother, Baby Berry, wanders away, and who do you think comes to the rescue?”                         [JPB MONTANARI]

dipper-and-mabelDipper and Mabel and the Curse of the Time Pirates Treasure by Jeffrey Rowe

“Once upon a time . . . travel, Blendin Blandin searches for the legendary Time Pirates’ Treasure, and he needs Dipper and Mabel’s help! They journey through time, exploring the dragon-infested medieval era, the weird-and-wild west, and the laser-and-giant-baby-filled future. Will they make the right choices to find the greatest treasure ever known? Or is it only a matter of time before the twins and Blendin are clutched by the hands of time?! This book features 272 pages of hilarious and thrilling adventures and original artwork!”                                    [J ROWE]

ticket-to-indiaTicket to India by N. H. Senzai

“A trip to India turns into a grand adventure in this contemporary novel about the Great Partition, from the award-winning author of Saving Kabul Corner and Shooting Kabul.

“A map, two train tickets, and a mission. These are things twelve-year-old Maya and her big sister Zara have when they set off on their own from Delhi to their grandmother’s childhood home of Aminpur, a small town in Northern India. Their goal is to find a chest of family treasures that their grandmother’s family left behind when they fled from India to Pakistan during the Great Partition. But soon the sisters become separated, and Maya is alone. Determined to find her grandmother’s lost chest, she continues her trip, on the way enlisting help from an orphan by named Jai.”               [J SENZAI,N]

emergency-vehiclesEmergency Vehicles by Rod Green

“Lift the flaps and look inside to learn all about amazing emergency vehicles!

“Look inside an ambulance, police car, fire engine, rescue helicopter, lifeboat, and more to discover their inner workings. With more than forty flaps to lift, Stephen Biesty’s award-winning and best-selling artwork brings these rescue vehicles to life in a whole new way.”                    [J629.225 GREEN]

This is my last Monday Children’s Book Reviews blog entry. I have enjoyed sharing them, and I hope you have enjoyed reading them!

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for January 23, 2017

love-is-my-favorite-thingLove is My Favorite Thing by Emma Chichester Clark

“Plum has lots of favorite things—catching sticks, her bear, her bed—but really, LOVE is her absolute favorite thing. She loves her family and all the things they do together. Sometimes, however, Plum’s exuberance causes trouble, and she just can’t help being naughty. But fortunately, love is such a great thing that even when she makes mistakes, Plum’s family still adores her.”                          [JPB CLARK]

every-single-secondEvery Single Second by Tricia Springstubb

“Twelve-year-old Nella Sabatini’s life is changing too soon, too fast. Her best friend, Clem, doesn’t seem concerned; she’s busy figuring out the best way to spend the ‘leap second’—an extra second about to be added to the world’s official clock. The only person who might understand how Nella feels is Angela, but the two of them have gone from being ‘secret sisters’ to not talking at all.

“Then Angela’s idolized big brother makes a terrible, fatal mistake, one that tears apart their tight-knit community and plunges his family into a whirlwind of harsh publicity and judgment. In the midst of this controversy, Nella is faced with a series of startling revelations about her parents, friends, and neighborhood. As Angela’s situation becomes dangerous, Nella must choose whether to stand by or stand up. Her heart tries to tell her what to do, but can you always trust your heart? The clock ticks down, and in that extra second, past and present merge—the future will be up to her.”                                 [J SPRINGSTUBB,T]

hello-ruby-adventures-in-codingHello Ruby: Adventures in Coding by Linda Liukas

“Meet Ruby–a small girl with a huge imagination. In Ruby’s world anything is possible if you put your mind to it. When her dad asks her to find five hidden gems Ruby is determined to solve the puzzle with the help of her new friends, including the Wise Snow Leopard, the Friendly Foxes, and the Messy Robots.

“As Ruby stomps around her world kids will be introduced to the basic concepts behind coding and programming through storytelling. Learn how to break big problems into small problems, repeat tasks, look for patterns, create step-by-step plans, and think outside the box. With hands-on activities included in every chapter, future coders will be thrilled to put their own imaginations to work.”         [J005.13 LIUKAS,L]

random-house-book-of-fairy-talesThe Random House Book of Fairy Tales adapted by Amy Ehrlich

“Nineteen of the best-known fairy tales, including ‘Rapunzel,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘Hansel and Gretel,’ and ‘Thumbelina’.”              [J398.21 EHRLICH,A]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for January 2, 2017

darkest-darkThe Darkest Dark by Astronaut Chris Hadfield

“Young Chris loves pretending he’s a brave astronaut, exploring the universe. Only one problem–at night, he’s afraid of the dark. Only when he watches the moon landing on TV does he realize how exciting the unknown can be. Inspired by the childhood of real-life astronaut Chris Hadfield.”                 [JPB HADFIELD]

paddington-plays-onPaddington Plays On by Michael Bond

“Paddington is having a wonderful time while on vacation with the Browns in a small French town. He loves exploring and meeting new friends. So how exactly does he end up marching through town as a drummer in the local band? Sure he can keep the beat on the drum. But can keep up with the band?”                 [JE BOND,M]

big-wishBig Wish by Brandon Robshaw

“When a shooting star grants Sam a million wishes (as long as they are logically possible) he thinks that he will be able to make his life better at his new school–but he soon learns that you have to be very careful, because wishes can have unexpected consequences.”     [J ROBSHAW,B]

animal-atlasAnimal Atlas by James Buckley, Jr.

“Animal Planet’s definitive atlas of animal life takes readers on a continent-by-continent and habitat-by-habitat passport to adventure! Meet fierce snow leopards in the Tibetan mountains, giant helicopter damselflies in the rain forests of Central America, majestic eagles in the temperate forests of North America, and hundreds more fascinating creatures. What is a habitat? How is the North Pole’s animal life different from the South Pole’s? How and why do animals adapt to their environment? Is a food web different from a food chain? Animal Planet Animal Atlas answers all these questions and more in a kid-friendly, accessible format that young readers, parents, teachers, and librarians will adore.”             [J590 BUCKLEY]

 

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for October 24, 2016

princess-and-the-ponyThe Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton

“Princess Pinecone would like a real war horse for her birthday, instead of which she gets a plump, cute pony–but sometimes cuteness can be a kind of weapon, especially in a fight with dodgeballs and spitballs and hairballs and squareballs.”           [JPB BEATON,K]

bad-kidThe Bad Kid by Sarah Lariviere

“Claudeline Feng LeBernardin is very good at being bad. Her Grandpa Si was a real-life gangster, and Claude always thought she’d take over the family business when he was gone. Instead, Claude’s dad is in charge—and she’s sure he’s running things into the ground. She wants to step in, but her parents are keeping secrets and her partner in crime, Fingerless Brett, is suddenly on the straight and narrow.

“Then, when a very strange character by the name of Alma Lingonberry shows up in the neighborhood, Claude gets closer to the crime life than ever. Before long, she’s swept up in a maddening mystery that’s got her wondering: What does it really mean to be bad?”                        [J LARIVIERE,S]

american-girl-bakingAmerican Girl Baking

“Collects more than forty easy-to-follow recipes for aspiring bakers that are fit for any occasion, from cupcakes and cookies to madeleines and tartlets.”             [J641.8654 AMERICAN]

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for September 19, 2016

cleo edisonCleo Edison Oliver, Playground Millionaire by Sundee T. Frazier

“Organizing what she believes to be a quick-and-painless loose tooth removal business for her fifth-grade project, multiracial entrepreneur-in-training Cleo struggles with a queasy client, an estrangement with her best friend and an insensitive bully. By the award-winning author of Brendan Buckley’s Universe and Everything In It.”        [J FRAZIER,S]

tiny piece of skyA Tiny Piece of Sky by Shawn K. Stout

“World War II is coming in Europe. At least that’s what Frankie Baum heard on the radio. But from her small town in Maryland, in the wilting summer heat of 1939, the war is a world away.

“Besides, there are too many other things to think about: first that Frankie’s father up and bought a restaurant without telling anyone and now she has to help in the kitchen, peeling potatoes and washing dishes, when she’d rather be racing to Wexler’s Five and Dime on her skates. Plus her favorite sister, Joanie Baloney, is away for the summer and hasn’t been answering any of Frankie’s letters.

“But when some people in town start accusing her father of being a German spy, all of a sudden the war arrives at Frankie’s feet and she can think of nothing else.

“Could the rumors be true? Frankie has to do some spying of her own to try to figure out her father’s secrets and clear his good name. What she discovers about him surprises everyone, but is nothing compared to what she discovers about the world.”             [J STOUT,S]

what are you glad aboutWhat are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About? Poems For When a Person Needs a Poem by Judith Viorst

“From the beloved and internationally bestselling author of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, Judith Viorst comes a brand-new collection of clever, hilarious, and poignant poems that touch on every aspect of the roller-coaster ride that is childhood.

“Did you wake up this morning all smiley inside?
Does life taste like ice cream and cake?
Or does it seem more like your goldfish just died
And your insides are one great big ache?

“From school to family to friends, from Grrrr to Hooray!, Judith Viorst takes us on a tour of feelings of all kinds in this thoughtful, funny, and charming collection of poetry that’s perfect for young readers just learning to sort out their own emotions.”         [J811.54 VIORST]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for August 22, 2016

secret agent man goes shoppingSecret Agent Man Goes Shopping for Shoes by Tim Wynne-Jones and Brian Won

“Secret Agent Man (S.A.M.) needs new shoes. His mom — er, sidekick, ‘K’ (short for Kay) — takes him shopping. But the operation will be dangerous: to start with, Shoe Store Man looks shifty. ‘Frisk him,’ says S.A.M. With the help of a Team of Expert Spies and keen observation skills, will Sam find that his brand-new tiger-striped shoes convey a new superpower . . . and that he can now tie his own shoelaces? Imaginative play is the mission in this witty picture book with retro illustrations that cleverly merge S.A.M.’s escapades with the ordinary world. Roar!”     [JPB WYNNE-JONES,T]

secrets of the dragon tombSecrets of the Dragon Tomb by Patrick Samphire

“Mars in 1816 is a world of high society, deadly danger, and strange clockwork machines. Pterodactyls glide through the sky, automatic servants hand out sandwiches at elegant garden parties, and in the north, the great dragon tombs hide marvels of Ancient Martian technology.

“Twelve-year-old Edward Sullivan has always dreamed of becoming a spy like the ones he reads of in his favorite sci-fi magazine, Thrilling Martian Tales. Instead, he spends his days keeping his eccentric family from complete disaster . . . that is, until the villainous archaeologist Sir Titus Dane kidnaps Edward’s parents as part of a scheme to loot an undiscovered dragon tomb. Edward sets out on a perilous journey to save his parents and protect the dragon tombs in the process. Turns out spywork is a bit more challenging than he had imagined. . . .”               [J SAMPHIRE,P]

one thousand thingsOne Thousand Things by Anna Kovecses

“A  visual encyclopedia of first words to see and say. Search-and-find Little Mouse on every page and discover new words with every turn of the page. Stylishly laid out, the book is arranged by theme and features fully illustrated collections of ‘things’, each clearly labeled and easy to recognize. This 80 page book covers everything from space to the human body.”          [J428.1 KOVECSES]

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for August 1, 2016

i will not wear pinkI Will Not Wear Pink by Joyce Dunbar and Polly Dunbar

“When Plunkett the pig gets an invitation from Priscilla Pig he is excited, until he sees the dress code: WEAR PINK. Plunkett sets out for the party adorned in the pink outfit Priscilla has sent him, but very soon flings away the prescribed party gear in favour of his own favorite colour his own skin, which also happens to be pink! A glorious romp in celebration of personal freedom and choice, and also featuring glorious brown mud as well as a romantic ending!”         [JPB DUNBAR,J]

sir pete the braveSir Pete the Brave by James Dean

“Riding his loyal horse, climbing tall towers and listening to Lady Callie’s singing, Sir Pete the groovy cat-knight embarks on a daring quest when Lady Callie, the most awesome harpist in all the land, is carried off by a fire-breathing dragon.”         [JE DEAN,J]

school of the deadSchool of the Dead by Avi

“In this spine-tingling story from Newbery Medal winner Avi, a boy must solve the mystery of the ghost haunting him.

“For most of Tony Gilbert’s life, he has thought of his uncle as ‘Weird Uncle Charlie.’ That is, until Uncle Charlie moves in with Tony and his family. Uncle Charlie is still odd, of course—talking about spirits and other supernatural stuff—but he and Tony become fast friends, and Tony ends up having a lot of fun with Uncle Charlie.

“When Uncle Charlie dies suddenly, Tony is devastated. Then he starts seeing Uncle Charlie everywhere! It doesn’t help that Tony switched schools—it was Uncle Charlie’s dying wish that Tony attend the Penda School, where Uncle Charlie himself went as a kid. The Penda School is eerie enough without his uncle’s ghost making it worse. On top of that, rumors have been circulating about a student who went missing shortly before Tony arrived. Could that somehow be related to Uncle Charlie’s ghost?”

“Full of twists and turns that get spookier by the chapter, School of the Dead is a fast-paced mystery that Avi’s fans will devour!”             [J AVI]

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