Tag Archives: friendship

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for January 23, 2017

love-is-my-favorite-thingLove is My Favorite Thing by Emma Chichester Clark

“Plum has lots of favorite things—catching sticks, her bear, her bed—but really, LOVE is her absolute favorite thing. She loves her family and all the things they do together. Sometimes, however, Plum’s exuberance causes trouble, and she just can’t help being naughty. But fortunately, love is such a great thing that even when she makes mistakes, Plum’s family still adores her.”                          [JPB CLARK]

every-single-secondEvery Single Second by Tricia Springstubb

“Twelve-year-old Nella Sabatini’s life is changing too soon, too fast. Her best friend, Clem, doesn’t seem concerned; she’s busy figuring out the best way to spend the ‘leap second’—an extra second about to be added to the world’s official clock. The only person who might understand how Nella feels is Angela, but the two of them have gone from being ‘secret sisters’ to not talking at all.

“Then Angela’s idolized big brother makes a terrible, fatal mistake, one that tears apart their tight-knit community and plunges his family into a whirlwind of harsh publicity and judgment. In the midst of this controversy, Nella is faced with a series of startling revelations about her parents, friends, and neighborhood. As Angela’s situation becomes dangerous, Nella must choose whether to stand by or stand up. Her heart tries to tell her what to do, but can you always trust your heart? The clock ticks down, and in that extra second, past and present merge—the future will be up to her.”                                 [J SPRINGSTUBB,T]

hello-ruby-adventures-in-codingHello Ruby: Adventures in Coding by Linda Liukas

“Meet Ruby–a small girl with a huge imagination. In Ruby’s world anything is possible if you put your mind to it. When her dad asks her to find five hidden gems Ruby is determined to solve the puzzle with the help of her new friends, including the Wise Snow Leopard, the Friendly Foxes, and the Messy Robots.

“As Ruby stomps around her world kids will be introduced to the basic concepts behind coding and programming through storytelling. Learn how to break big problems into small problems, repeat tasks, look for patterns, create step-by-step plans, and think outside the box. With hands-on activities included in every chapter, future coders will be thrilled to put their own imaginations to work.”         [J005.13 LIUKAS,L]

random-house-book-of-fairy-talesThe Random House Book of Fairy Tales adapted by Amy Ehrlich

“Nineteen of the best-known fairy tales, including ‘Rapunzel,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ ‘Hansel and Gretel,’ and ‘Thumbelina’.”              [J398.21 EHRLICH,A]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for December 5, 2016

pearl-harbour-largeThis Wednesday, December 7, is the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the event which led directly to the entry of the United States into World War II.

same-same-but-differentSame, Same But Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw

“Elliot lives in America, and Kailash lives in India. They are pen pals. By exchanging letters and pictures, they learn that they both love to climb trees, have pets, and go to school. Their worlds might look different, but they are actually similar. Same, same. But different!”         [JPB KOSTECKI-SHAW,J]

beautiful-blue-worldBeautiful Blue World by Suzanne LaFleur

“At twelve, Mathilde Joss is the oldest child in a loving family. Her country has been at war for years, and bombing and food shortages continue to increase. When the army announces that children over twelve can take a test to be chosen to serve their country, and that the relatives of children who serve will be well paid, Mathilde decides to take the test to help her family, even though she knows that it is her brilliant best friend Megs who will be selected.

“What follows is a gripping and suspenseful reimagining of war, where even kindness can be a weapon, and children have the power to see what adults cannot. It is as heartwarming as it is heartbreaking.”         [J LAFLEUR,S]

paxPax by Sara Pennypacker

“Pax and Peter have been inseparable ever since Peter rescued him as a kit. But one day, the unimaginable happens: Peter’s dad enlists in the military and makes him return the fox to the wild.

“At his grandfather’s house, three hundred miles away from home, Peter knows he isn’t where he should be—with Pax. He strikes out on his own despite the encroaching war, spurred by love, loyalty, and grief, to be reunited with his fox.

“Meanwhile Pax, steadfastly waiting for his boy, embarks on adventures and discoveries of his own. . . .”      [J PENNYPACKER,S]

boy-and-a-jaguarA Boy and a Jaguar by Alan Rabinowitz

“Alan loves animals, but the great cat house at the Bronx Zoo makes him sad. Why are they all alone in empty cages? Are they being punished? More than anything, he wants to be their champion—their voice—but he stutters uncontrollably.

“Except when he talks to animals…    Then he is fluent.

“Follow the life of the man Time Magazine calls, ‘the Indiana Jones of wildlife conservation’ as he searches for his voice and fulfills a promise to speak for animals, and people, who cannot speak for themselves.”                                [JB RABINOWITZ,A]

blood-brotherBlood Brother: Jonathan Daniels and His Sacrifice for Civil Rights by Rich Wallace and Sandra Neil Wallace

“Jonathan Daniels, a white seminary student from New Hampshire, traveled to Selma, Alabama, in 1965 to help with voter registration of black residents. After the voting rights marches, he remained in Alabama, in the area known as Bloody Lowndes, an extremely dangerous area for white freedom fighters, to assist civil rights workers. Five months later, Jonathan Daniels was shot and killed while saving the life of Ruby Sales, a black teenager. Through Daniels’s poignant letters, papers, photographs, and taped interviews, authors Rich Wallace and Sandra Neil Wallace explore what led Daniels to the moment of his death, the trial of his murderer, and how these events helped reshape both the legal and political climate of Lowndes County and the nation.”                     [ JB DANIELS,J]

complete-photo-guide-to-knittingComplete Photo Guide to Knitting by Mary Scott Huff

Creative Kids Complete Photo Guide to Knitting starts with the absolute basics about knitting, beginning with a discussion about needles and yarn, how to cast stitches onto the needle, then gradually introduces skills and techniques until kids are knitting confidently.

“Mary Scott Huff will guide you  through projects. With over 200 photos and clear, concise instructions in language easily understood by grade-school kids, you’re going to be creating crafty knit projects in no time!

“Each project lists the knitting skills that will be exercised in making it and projects are rated for difficulty, so kids can learn and grow as they develop dexterity and coordination. You will learn to knit by making simple projects and building skills by practicing the essentials, and this book provides a sound foundation for a lifetime of knitting enjoyment.”      [J746.432 HUFF]

 

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 28, 2016

buddy-and-earl-and-the-great-big-babyBuddy and Earl and the Great Big Baby by Maureen Fergus

“Mom’s friend Mrs. Cunningham is coming for a visit, and she’s bringing her baby! While Buddy the dog tries to explain the ins and outs of babydom to Earl the hedgehog, neither of them is prepared for the chaos the small and adorable creature brings with it. When the baby manages to escape from its cage– which Buddy gently suggests is really just a playpen– it’s up to our favorite odd couple to save the day.” The third book in the Buddy and Earl series.         [JPB FERGUS,M]

fly-guys-ninja-christmasFly Guy’s Ninja Christmas by Todd Arnold

” It is Christmas Eve and Fly Guy realizes that he does not have a present to give to his best friend Buzz–but when he looks around the house searching for something suitable he discovers a stranger in a red suit, and decides to attack with some ninja moves.”  From the Fly Guy series.             [JE ARNOLD,T]

first-last-dayThe First Last Day by Dorian Cirrone

“The magic of summer comes to life in this enchanting middle grade debut about an eleven-year-old girl who must save the future by restarting time after she realizes that her wish to relive the last day of summer may not have been such a great thing after all.

“After finding a mysterious set of paints in her backpack, eleven-year-old Haleigh Adams paints a picture of her last day at the New Jersey shore. When she wakes up the next morning, Haleigh finds that her wish for an endless summer with her new friend Kevin has come true. At first, she’s thrilled, but Haliegh soon learns that staying in one place—and time—comes with a price.

“And when Haleigh realizes her parents have been keeping a secret, she is faced with a choice: do nothing and miss out on the good things that come with growing up or find the secret of the time loop she’s trapped in and face the inevitable realities of moving on.

“As she and Kevin set out to find the source of the magic paints, Haleigh worries it might be too late. Will she be able to restart time? Or will it be the biggest mistake of her life?”                 [J CIRRONE,D]

everything-you-need-to-ace-american-historyEverything You Need to Ace American History in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Lily Rothman

“An exciting book for all middle schoolers (6th-8th grade) who wish they had taken better notes in american history class or just want to jump to the head of the class. Each Big Fat Notebook is like getting to borrow the notebook of the best student in American history class, the one who not only writes down the important points the teacher makes—noting those crucial “you will get tested on these” facts—but also meticulously transcribes key points from the chalkboard and pastes teacher handouts into her notebook. Part “CliffsNotes,” part workbook, this study hack will help kids focus on the things they need to remember in order to rock their middle school exams and ace american history.

Everything You Need to Ace American History in One Big Fat Notebook covers the following topics and more:

Native Americans
The Colonies
The Revolutionary War
American Expansion
The War of 1812
Civil War Reconstruction
The Industrial Revolution
Immigration Imperialism
World War I & II
The Great Depression
The New Deal
Civil Rights
The Vietnam War
The Cold War
9/11
War in Iraq
Universal Healthcare                                                                [ J973.071 EVERYTHING]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 14, 2016

nanobotsNanoBots by Chris Gall

“A boy inventor creates the ultimate in high-tech superheroes that could one day save the world–but they have some smaller problems to take on first! NanoBots are tiny. They’re almost too small to see, but they can each do a unique and important job: Medibot makes sure their Inventor never catches a cold…. Chewbots gobble up that gum the Inventor trampled into the carpet… Binobot scans the scene of a crime for clues the Inventor could never see… and Seekerbots explore to meet microscopic new creatures.

“These bots and their high-tech friends sure make the inventor’s life easier, but when the most AWESOME robot in town is in real trouble, they must band together and prove that sometimes the SMALLEST helpers can be the BIGGEST heroes! Includes fun facts about real nanotechnology in the backmatter.”             [JPB GALL,C]

murder-is-bad-mannersMurder is Bad Manners by Robin Stevens

“Two friends form a detective agency—and must solve their first murder case—in this ‘sharp-witted debut’ (Publishers Weekly, starred review) that is the first adventure in a brand-new middle grade mystery series set at a 1930s boarding school.

“Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are best friends at Deepdean School for Girls, and they both have a penchant for solving mysteries. In fact, outspoken Daisy is a self-described Sherlock Holmes, and she appoints wallflower Hazel as her own personal Watson when they form their own (secret!) detective agency. The only problem? They have nothing to investigate.

“But that changes once Hazel discovers the body of their science teacher, Miss Bell—and the body subsequently disappears. She and Daisy are certain a murder must have taken place, and they can think of more than one person with a motive.

“Determined to get to the bottom of the crime—and to prove that it happened—before the killer strikes again, Hazel and Daisy must hunt for evidence, spy on their suspects, and use all the cunning, scheming, and intuition they can muster. But will they succeed? And can their friendship stand the test?”                 [J STEVENS,R]

everything-you-need-to-ace-englishEverything You Need to Ace English Language Arts In One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide

“An exciting book for all middle schoolers (6th-8th grade) who wish they had taken better notes in English class or just want to jump to the head of the class. Each Big Fat Notebook is like getting to borrow the notebook of the best student in English class, the one who not only writes down the important points the teacher makes—noting those crucial ‘you will get tested on these’ facts—but also meticulously transcribes key points from the chalkboard and pastes teacher handouts into her notebook. Part ‘CliffsNotes,’ part workbook, this study hack will help kids focus on the things they need to remember in order to rock their middle school exams and ace English language arts.”             [J372.61 EVERYTHING]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for September 26, 2016

dianas white house gardenDiana’s White House Garden by Elisa Carbone

“Diana Hopkins lived in a white house. THE White House.

“World War II is in full force across the seas. It’s 1943, President Roosevelt is in office, and Diana’s father, Harry Hopkins, is his chief advisor. And Diana wants to be part of the war effort. After some well-intentioned missteps (her quarantine sign on her father’s office door was not well-received), the President requests her help with his newest plan for the country’s survival: Victory Gardens!

“From award-winning author Elisa Carbone comes the true story of how Diana Hopkins started her own Victory Garden on the White House lawn under the tutelage of Eleanor Roosevelt. With dedication and patience, she showed the nation that the war effort started first on the homefront.”                                                 [JPB CARBONE,E]

chloe in indiaChloe in India by Kate Darnton

“Though they’re divided by class, language, appearance—you name it—Chloe and Lakshmi have a lot in common. Both girls are new to Class Five at Premium Academy in New Delhi, India, and neither seems to fit in. But they soon discover how extraordinary an ordinary friendship can be and how celebrating our individuality can change the world.”         [J DARNTON,K]

audacity jones to the rescueAudacity Jones to the Rescue by Kirby Larson

“Audacity Jones is an eleven-year-old orphan who aches for adventure, a challenge to break up the monotony of her life at Miss Maisie’s School for Wayward Girls. Life as a wayward girl isn’t so bad; Audie has the best of friends, a clever cat companion, and plenty of books to read. Still, she longs for some excitement, like the characters in the novels she so loves encounter.

“So when the mysterious Commodore Crutchfield visits the school and whisks Audie off to Washington, DC, she knows she’s in for the journey of a lifetime. But soon, it becomes clear that the Commodore has unsavory plans for Audie — plans that involve the president of the United States and a sinister kidnapping plot. Before she knows it, Audie winds up in the White House kitchens, where she’s determined to stop the Commodore dead in his tracks. Can Audie save the day before it’s too late?”                   ]J LARSON,K]

angry birds movie laughtastic joke bookThe Angry Birds Movie Laughtastic Joke Book by Courtney Carbone

“Even Angry Birds get the giggles. Characters from The Angry Birds Movie come together in this 144-page collection of perfectly silly jokes and rollicking riddles. Arranged thematically, each section is chock-full of humorous riffs that will tickle kids’ funny bones.”         [J818.602 CARBONE]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for September 19, 2016

cleo edisonCleo Edison Oliver, Playground Millionaire by Sundee T. Frazier

“Organizing what she believes to be a quick-and-painless loose tooth removal business for her fifth-grade project, multiracial entrepreneur-in-training Cleo struggles with a queasy client, an estrangement with her best friend and an insensitive bully. By the award-winning author of Brendan Buckley’s Universe and Everything In It.”        [J FRAZIER,S]

tiny piece of skyA Tiny Piece of Sky by Shawn K. Stout

“World War II is coming in Europe. At least that’s what Frankie Baum heard on the radio. But from her small town in Maryland, in the wilting summer heat of 1939, the war is a world away.

“Besides, there are too many other things to think about: first that Frankie’s father up and bought a restaurant without telling anyone and now she has to help in the kitchen, peeling potatoes and washing dishes, when she’d rather be racing to Wexler’s Five and Dime on her skates. Plus her favorite sister, Joanie Baloney, is away for the summer and hasn’t been answering any of Frankie’s letters.

“But when some people in town start accusing her father of being a German spy, all of a sudden the war arrives at Frankie’s feet and she can think of nothing else.

“Could the rumors be true? Frankie has to do some spying of her own to try to figure out her father’s secrets and clear his good name. What she discovers about him surprises everyone, but is nothing compared to what she discovers about the world.”             [J STOUT,S]

what are you glad aboutWhat are You Glad About? What Are You Mad About? Poems For When a Person Needs a Poem by Judith Viorst

“From the beloved and internationally bestselling author of Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, Judith Viorst comes a brand-new collection of clever, hilarious, and poignant poems that touch on every aspect of the roller-coaster ride that is childhood.

“Did you wake up this morning all smiley inside?
Does life taste like ice cream and cake?
Or does it seem more like your goldfish just died
And your insides are one great big ache?

“From school to family to friends, from Grrrr to Hooray!, Judith Viorst takes us on a tour of feelings of all kinds in this thoughtful, funny, and charming collection of poetry that’s perfect for young readers just learning to sort out their own emotions.”         [J811.54 VIORST]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for August 1, 2016

i will not wear pinkI Will Not Wear Pink by Joyce Dunbar and Polly Dunbar

“When Plunkett the pig gets an invitation from Priscilla Pig he is excited, until he sees the dress code: WEAR PINK. Plunkett sets out for the party adorned in the pink outfit Priscilla has sent him, but very soon flings away the prescribed party gear in favour of his own favorite colour his own skin, which also happens to be pink! A glorious romp in celebration of personal freedom and choice, and also featuring glorious brown mud as well as a romantic ending!”         [JPB DUNBAR,J]

sir pete the braveSir Pete the Brave by James Dean

“Riding his loyal horse, climbing tall towers and listening to Lady Callie’s singing, Sir Pete the groovy cat-knight embarks on a daring quest when Lady Callie, the most awesome harpist in all the land, is carried off by a fire-breathing dragon.”         [JE DEAN,J]

school of the deadSchool of the Dead by Avi

“In this spine-tingling story from Newbery Medal winner Avi, a boy must solve the mystery of the ghost haunting him.

“For most of Tony Gilbert’s life, he has thought of his uncle as ‘Weird Uncle Charlie.’ That is, until Uncle Charlie moves in with Tony and his family. Uncle Charlie is still odd, of course—talking about spirits and other supernatural stuff—but he and Tony become fast friends, and Tony ends up having a lot of fun with Uncle Charlie.

“When Uncle Charlie dies suddenly, Tony is devastated. Then he starts seeing Uncle Charlie everywhere! It doesn’t help that Tony switched schools—it was Uncle Charlie’s dying wish that Tony attend the Penda School, where Uncle Charlie himself went as a kid. The Penda School is eerie enough without his uncle’s ghost making it worse. On top of that, rumors have been circulating about a student who went missing shortly before Tony arrived. Could that somehow be related to Uncle Charlie’s ghost?”

“Full of twists and turns that get spookier by the chapter, School of the Dead is a fast-paced mystery that Avi’s fans will devour!”             [J AVI]

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