Tag Archives: moving

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for October 19, 2015

fine dessert A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat by Emily Jenkins and Sophie Blackall

“In 1710, a girl and her mother in Lyme, England, prepare a blackberry fool, picking wild blackberries and beating cream from their cow with a bundle of twigs. The same dessert is prepared by a slave girl and her mother in 1810 in Charleston, South Carolina; by a mother and daughter in 1910 in Boston; and finally by a boy and his father in present-day San Diego.

“In this fascinating picture book, four families, in four different cities, over four centuries, make the same delicious dessert: blackberry fool. This richly detailed book ingeniously shows how food, technology, and even families have changed throughout American history. Kids and parents alike will delight in discovering the differences in daily life over the course of four centuries.

“Includes a recipe for blackberry fool and notes from the author and illustrator about their research.”     [JPB JENKINS]

me and my big mouthMe and My Big Mouth by Jeff Anderson

“Zack Delacruz is unnoticed at his middle school—and that’s just the way he likes it. But a school assembly, a typhoon of spit, and an uncharacteristic moment of bravery are all it takes to change everything. Suddenly Zack is in charge of the class fundraiser. Worse, his partner is the school’s biggest bully! If they don’t sell all the chocolate bars, there will be no dance for the sixth grade. Zack never wanted to be a hero, but with his classmates’ hopes on the line, can he save the day?”                   [J ANDERSON,J]

anywhere but paradise Anywhere But Paradise by Anne Bustard

“It’s 1960 and Peggy Sue has just been transplanted from Texas to Hawaii for her father’s new job. Her cat, Howdy, is stuck in animal quarantine, and she’s baffled by Hawaiian customs and words. Worst of all, eighth grader Kiki Kahana targets Peggy Sue because she is haole–white–warning her that unless she does what Kiki wants, she will be a victim on ‘kill haole day,’ the last day of school. Peggy Sue’s home ec teacher insists that she help Kiki with her sewing project or risk failing. Life looks bleak until Peggy Sue meets Malina, whose mother gives hula lessons.

“But when her parents take a trip to Hilo, leaving Peggy Sue at Malina’s, life takes an unexpected twist in the form of a tsunami. Peggy Sue is knocked unconscious and wakes to learn that her parents safety and whereabouts are unknown. Peggy Sue has to summon all her courage to have hope that they will return safely.”         [J BUSTARD,A]

book of animal recordsBook of Animal Records by Mark Carwardine

“Here are the achievers and the unique from the animal world: mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fishes and invertebrates. These are not only familiar records like highest, fastest, largest, these are the unusual, such as slowest growth (the deep sea clam), most pecks in a day (black woodpecker), noisiest bird (booming Kakapo) and worst climber (western fence lizards fall out of their oak tree homes about 12,000 times a year).

“There are myth-busters — centipedes have the most legs, not millipedes, and fascinating stories — two “dead” specimens of desert snail were glued onto a museum display tablet only to come out of hibernation four years later. There is a lot of the bizarre (horned lizards from western North America can squirt blood from their eyes) and the ingenious (humpback whales use bubbles as fishing nets).

“Natural History Museum Book of Animal Records includes almost 900 records that show the diversity and wonder of the animal kingdom.”                             [J590 CARWARDINE,M]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for April 27, 2015

10 little rubber ducks10 Little Rubber Ducks by Eric Carle

“Based on a true story, an amusing tale tells about ten rubber ducks who, after being tossed overboard a ship during a storm, find themselves floating alone on the high seas–reaching lands and meeting people far away from their original destination.”             [JPB CARLE,E]

square cat abcSquare Cat ABC by Elizabeth Schoonmaker

“Each letter of the alphabet tells the story of an adorable mouse who discovers Eula, a hip-yet-square cat, in her garden. Mouse wants a taste of his favorite vegetable, spinach, but our four-sided feline hates the green leafy stuff. Enter the threatening, pointed quills of a porcupine, and Mouse is ready to run! One letter leads to another and by the story’s end, Mouse and Porcupine are pals—and Eula might even try a taste of zesty spinach.”             [JPB  SCHOONMAKER,E]

bo at iditarod creekBo at Iditarod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill

“Ever since five-year-old Bo can remember, she and her papas have lived in the little Alaskan mining town of Ballard Creek. Now the family must move upriver to Iditarod Creek for work at a new mine, and Bo is losing the only home she’s ever known. Initially homesick, she soon realizes that there is warmth and friendship to be found everywhere . . . and what’s more, her new town may hold an unexpected addition to her already unconventional family.

“This stand-alone sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek  is a story about love, inclusion, and day-to-day living in the rugged Alaskan bush of the late 1920s. Full of fascinating details, it is an unforgettable story.”      [J HILL,K]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 24, 2014

It’s Thanksgiving week – and you’re probably out of school! What to do? The possibilities for fun are ENDLESS!!

Last week the film The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 came out in the theaters, and this week The Penguins of Madagascar will debut.

And it’s always fun to decorate the house with fun crafts, like place mats and centerpieces. I just did a quick Google search and came up with some cool stuff, like:

Mod Mayflower            [http://www.parenting.com/gallery/thanksgiving-crafts-ideas]

  1. Cut off the bottom of a cup. Cut two slits with the tip of your scissors at the center edge of the cup. Place the cup, bottom side up, into the center of a cup holder.
  2. Cut 2 paper rectangles per boat to make sails. Cut 2 tiny slits at the center of each sail at the top and bottom. Push stirrers through the slits.
  3. Add a paper flag to the top of each mast. Push the sticks into the slits in the cup.                                                                                                                                                                     Turkey Game and Place Mat  To make this fun Thanksgiving craft, cut out two circles from construction paper for the body and head, and accent with paper to create the eyes, beak, and feet. Ask each child to create feathers from paper scraps, googly eyes, chenille stems, and other small crafts items. Then use the decorated turkeys as charming place mats.  [http://www.bhg.com/thanksgiving/crafts/easy-thanksgiving-kids-crafts/#page=2]

You can also find Thanksgiving craft ideas in books at the Library!

Or you can just enjoy your free time reading a good book:

Always by Emma Dodd

Whether you’re happy, sad, good, or bad, you will always be loved!     [JPB DODD]

The Turtle of Oman: A Novel by Naomi Shihab Nye

“When Aref, a third-grader who lives in Muscat, Oman, refuses to pack his suitcase and prepare to move to Michigan, his mother asks for help from his grandfather, his Siddi, who takes Aref around the country, storing up memories he can carry with him to a new home.”               [J NYE]

The History of Money: From Bartering to Banking by Martin Jenkins

“What can take the form of a stone with a hole in the middle, a string of shells, a piece of paper, or a plastic card? The answer is money, of course. But when did we start using it? And why? What does money have to do with writing? And how do taxes and interest work? From the Stone Age to modern banking, this lighthearted and engaging account traces the history of the stuff that makes the world go round.”                      [J332.4 JENKINS]

 

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