Tag Archives: trees

Monday Children’s Book Reviews for December 12, 2016

branchThe Branch by Mireille Messier and Pierre Pratt

“When a severe ice storm knocks a special branch from her favorite tree, a girl refuses to let it be discarded, and with the help of her neighbor, Mr. Frank, makes something new of it.”               [JPB MESSIER,M]

buddy-and-earl-and-the-adventureBuddy and Earl Go Exploring by Maureen Fergus

“Buddy and Earl are safely tucked in for the night; Buddy on his blanket and Earl in his cage. But just as Buddy settles in for a nice, long sleep, Earl says it’s time to say Bon voyage.

“Soon these mismatched pals are at it again, exploring the wilds of the kitchen and defending a lovely lady hedgehog – who may or may not be Mom’s hairbrush – from imminent danger. When they’ve finally vanquished the greatest monster of all – the vacuum cleaner – it’s time for some well-earned shut-eye.

“This second book in the Buddy and Earl series reunites this odd and loveable animal couple: a dog who likes to play by the rules and a hedgehog who knows no limits.”                     [JPB FERGUS,M]

water-princessThe Water Princess by Susan Verde

“With its wide sky and warm earth, Princess Gie Gie’s kingdom is a beautiful land. But clean drinking water is scarce in her small African village. And try as she might, Gie Gie cannot bring the water closer; she cannot make it run clearer. Every morning, she rises before the sun to make the long journey to the well. Instead of a crown, she wears a heavy pot on her head to collect the water. After the voyage home, after boiling the water to drink and clean with, Gie Gie thinks of the trip that tomorrow will bring. And she dreams. She dreams of a day when her village will have cool, crystal-clear water of its own.

“Inspired by the childhood of Burkina Faso–born model Georgie Badiel.”                      [JPB VERDE,S]

best-manThe Best Man by Richard Peck

“Archer Magill has spent a lively five years of grade school with one eye out in search of grown-up role models. Three of the best are his grandpa, the great architect; his dad, the great vintage car customizer; and his uncle Paul, who is just plain great. These are the three he wants to be. Along the way he finds a fourth—Mr. McLeod, a teacher. In fact, the first male teacher in the history of the school.

“But now here comes middle school and puberty. Change. Archer wonders how much change has to happen before his voice does. He doesn’t see too far ahead, so every day or so a startling revelation breaks over him. Then a really big one when he’s the best man at the wedding of two of his role models. But that gets ahead of the story.”       [J PECK,R]

irenas-childrenIrena’s Children: A True Story of Courage by Tilar J. Mazzeo

“This young readers edition of Irena’s Children tells Irena’s unbelievable story set during one of the worst times in modern history. With guts of steel and unfaltering bravery, Irena smuggled thousands of children out of the walled Jewish ghetto in toolboxes and coffins, snuck them under overcoats at checkpoints, and slipped them through the dank sewers and into secret passages that led to abandoned buildings, where she convinced her friends and underground resistance network to hide them.

“In this heroic tale of survival and resilience in the face of impossible odds, Tilar Mazzeo and adapter Mary Cronk Farrell share the true story of this bold and brave woman, overlooked by history, who risked her life to save innocent children from the horrors of the Holocaust.”                            [JB SENDLEROWA,I]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for July 4, 2016

Today is the Fourth of July, Independence Day.

4th-of-july-fireworks-clipart-4th-of-july-fireworks-graphic

on bird hillOn Bird Hill by Jane Yolen

“This charming book is loosely based on the old cumulative nursery rhyme/song “The Green Grass Grew All Around,” a nursery rhyme first published as a song in 1912 with words by William Jerome and melody by Harry Von Tilzer. But in this version, it’s a boy and his dog who find the bird in a nest on a hill in a strange valley.”        [JPB YOLEN,J]

mom dad and meMom, Dad, and Me by Christy Webster

“Disney/Pixar Inside Out takes you to a place everyone knows but no one has ever seen: the human mind. Perfect for girls and boys ages 4 to 6, this Step 2 Step into Reading leveled reader focuses on the importance of family.”     [JE WEBSTER,C]

most important thingThe Most Important Thing: Stories About Sons, Fathers & Grandfathers by Avi

“Luke sees the ghost of his father but can’t figure out what Dad wants him to do. Paul takes a camping trip with the grandfather he’s just met and discovers what lies behind the man’s erratic behavior. Ryan has some surprising questions when he interviews his prospective stepfather for the job. In a compellingly honest collection of stories, multiple-award-winning author Avi introduces seven boys — boys with fathers at home and boys whose fathers have left, boys who spend most of their time with their grandfathers and boys who would rather spend time with anyone but the men in their lives. By turns heartbreaking, hopeful, and funny, the stories show us boys seeking acceptance, guidance, or just someone to look up to. Each one shines a different light on the question ‘What is the most important thing a father can do for his son?'”            [J AVI]

ellis islandEllis Island by Elizabeth Carney

“Explore the history of Ellis Island, one of the most recognized landmarks in American history. Kids will learn about its early history as a Mohegan island and rest spot for fishermen through its time as a famous immigration station to today’s museum.”                        [ J304.873 CARNEY]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for March 24, 2014

Maple by Lori Nichols

“When Maple is tiny, her parents plant a maple tree in her honor. She and her tree grow up together, and even though a tree doesn’t always make an ideal playmate, it doesn’t mind when Maple is in the mood to be loud –which is often. Then Maple becomes a big sister, and finds that babies have their loud days, too. Fortunately, Maple and her beloved tree know just what the baby needs.”             [JPB NICHOLS]

A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd

“Midnight Gulch used to be a magical place, a town where people could sing up thunderstorms and dance up sunflowers. But that was long ago, before a curse drove the magic away. Twelve-year-old Felicity knows all about things like that; her nomadic mother is cursed with a wandering heart. But when she arrives in Midnight Gulch, Felicity thinks her luck’s about to change.

“A ‘word collector,’ Felicity sees words everywhere—shining above strangers, tucked into church eves, and tangled up her dog’s floppy ears—but Midnight Gulch is the first place she’s ever seen the word ‘home.’ And then there’s Jonah, a mysterious, spiky-haired do-gooder who shimmers with words Felicity’s never seen before, words that make Felicity’s heart beat a little faster.

“Felicity wants to stay in Midnight Gulch more than anything, but first, she’ll need to figure out how to bring back the magic, breaking the spell that’s been cast over the town . . . and her mother’s broken heart.”     [J LLOYD]

Castles and Knights by Fleur Star

“Explores what life was like inside castles and describes the education, armor, and weapons of knights.

Eye Wonder was specially developed for children aged five plus, featuring astonishing photography exhibiting subjects within their natural setting, offering a whole new level of information through powerful images. The vocabulary is accessible to young readers, with the meanings of new, subject-related words clearly explained.”                     [J940.1 STAR]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 18, 2013

Dusk by Uri Shulevitz

“One December afternoon, boy with dog and grandfather with beard take a walk to watch the sun begin to set over the river. When the sun drops low in the sky, they start home. Buildings grow dimmer. People are rushing. As nature’s lights go out, one by one, city’s lights turn on, revealing brilliant Hanukkah, Kwanza, and Christmas displays in streets, homes, and stores. A stunning picture book that’s sure to be a winter holiday classic by Caldecott Medalist Uri Shulevitz.”   [JPB SHULEVITZ]

Bones and the Apple Pie Mystery by David A. Adler

“Detective Jeffrey Bones and Grandpa visit Grandpa’s friend Sally–the best apple pie baker around. Today, she’s practicing for the Best Pie Contest held at the county fair. But when it’s finally time to eat the pies, they are nowhere to be found–not in the oven, on the counter top, or on the table. Did Sally’s dog Oliver eat them? Detective Jeffrey Bones is on the case!” Penguin young readers. Level 3, Transitional reader. #10 in the Bones series.      [JE ADLER]

Sasquatch in the Paint by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Raymond Obstfeld

“Theo Rollins is starting eighth grade six inches taller, and his new height is making everyone expect more from him. Coach Mandrake wants to transform him from invisible science geek into star basketball player, even though Theo has little experience with the game. When Theo tries to hone his skills by playing pick-up ball in the park, kids are eager to include him at first; then they quickly see that he has no control of his gangly body. A girl named Rain even dubs him “Sasquatch.” To make matters worse, all his time spent on training is starting to hurt his science club’s chances of winning the “Aca-lympics,” the school’s trivia competition. Just when Theo thinks he can’t handle any more pressure, he’s accused of stealing. Can he find the real thief before he is  kicked off the basketball and science club teams, or will his attempt at sleuthing be yet another air ball?”       [J ABDUL-JABBAR, K.]

The Tree Lady, the True Story of How One Tree-Loving Woman Changed a City Forever by H. Joseph Hopkins and Jill McElmurry

“Katherine Olivia Sessions never thought she’d live in a place without trees. After all, Kate grew up among the towering pines and redwoods of Northern California. But after becoming the first woman to graduate from the University of California with a degree in science, she took a job as a teacher far south in the dry desert town of San Diego. Where there were almost no trees.

“Kate decided that San Diego needed trees more than anything else. So this trailblazing young woman singlehandedly started a massive movement that transformed the town into the green, garden-filled oasis it is today. Now, more than 100 years after Kate first arrived in San Diego, her gorgeous gardens and parks can be found all over the city.”              [JB SESSIONS, K]

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