Tag Archives: Write Your Story @ the Union City Library

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library….Getting Published


Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month: June 20 & July 18 and August 15  1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published : How to Write It, Sell It, and Market It Successfully

Presents a guide for aspiring writers on all aspects of getting published, including writing the query letter, getting an agent, signing contracts, working with publishers, assisting in prepub publicity and marketing, and doing book tours.

 

 

 

 

101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists : Insider Secrets from Top Writers 

This title focuses on the behaviors necessary to succeed in the dog-eat-dog world of fiction writing by asking successful authors how they practice their craft. Readers will learn how to adopt those habits on their quest to become novelists. The book will inspire, nourish, and provide the needed kick in the pants to turn the wannabes into doers! The 101 Habits of Highly Successful Novelists is full of “aha” experiences as the reader uncovers the collected wisdom from the cream of today’s fiction writers.

 

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Write Your Story…Bob Dylan The Lyrics 1961-2012

 

 

The ultimate collection for every Bob Dylan fan: A beautiful, comprehensive volume of Dylan’s lyrics, from the beginning of his career through the present day.

As it was well put by Al Kooper (the man behind the organ on “Like a Rolling Stone”), “Bob is the equivalent of William Shakespeare. What Shakespeare did in his time, Bob does in his time.” Christopher Ricks, editor of T.S. Eliot, Samuel Beckett, Tennyson, and The Oxford Book of English Verse, has no argument with Mr. Kooper’s assessment, and Dylan well worth celebrating and studying in this authoritative edition of his lyrics. Ricks says: “For fifty years, all the world has delighted in Bob Dylan’s books of words and more than words: provocative, mysterious, touching, baffling, not-to-be-pinned-down, intriguing, and a reminder that genius is free to do as it chooses. And, again and again, these are not the words that he sings on the initially released albums.”

This collection changes things, giving us the words from officially released studio and live recordings, as well as selected variant lyrics and revisions to these, recent revisions and retrospective ones; and, from the archives, words that, till now, have not been published. The Lyrics, edited with diligence by leading Dylan scholars, is the ultimate, definitive source for unpacking Dylan’s enormous, varied, and rich lyrical catalog. As set down, as sung, and as sung again.

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month: April 18 &May 16

and June 20  1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

 

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Filed under Events, Union City Library

Write Your Story…. San Francisco Writers Conference

San Francisco Writers Conference Take-aways

Submitted by Terry Connelly, Library Senior Member.

February 16-19 I attended the San Francisco Writers Conference at the Mark Hopkins Hotel. It was a sold out event, with hundreds of “wannabe” authors as well as established publishers, authors, agents, editors and author coaches.

There were many interesting sessions, in fact, too many for one person to attend.

I took notes, so as to remember the bits and pieces of advice given. Following are those things that seemed most important.

  1. Creative nonfiction is now called narrative fiction. Memoir falls into this category. The nice thing about the title change is that it allows for the recalled essence of dialogue that most likely took place.
  2. Book Club fiction are those pieces that inspire discussion and tends to appeal to women readers. Think JoJo Moyes. Commercial fiction are titles that appeal to a wide range of reader. Think Gone Girl.
  3. In terms of what agents want to see and don’t want to see, here are a few tips:
    1. No prologues or epilogues for debut authors. They feel this is “a lazy way to jumpstart tension”
    2. No first lines of dialogue.
    3. Skip flashbacks altogether unless there is something about the memory that adds to the emotional history of a character.
  4. Be careful about including diverse characters unless you are well informed about the particular group. For example, when including an African-American character, verify with a trusted source to make sure that you are not typecasting or stereotyping. Avoid writing in dialect unless you are very familiar with that dialect, and it is important to the essence of the story.
  5. Within each scene, look at how the flow of time is reported. How much time has elapsed? But avoid terms such as “three days later”.
  6. Within scene, also be aware of change. In each segment, there must be a starting place and then an ending place, and change must have occurred. There is external change, in which a character moves from one place to another. Internal change is the most powerful, as this lets the reader see how it impacts the character.
  7. When editing, it nothing is happening in a scene, no forward movement, no choice-making or risk-taking, then delete.
  8. Characters should behave in a logical way, unless strange behavior is part of the character’s M.O. People come to story to see logical human behavior, verified with an underpinning of evidence. Must believe that the character is a living human being. People do stupid things all the time. Readers question what in their lives forced them to act that way.
  9. Be watchful for the “dreaded middle”, which is the part of a scene where things get too slow. When this happens in your work, cut the scene or condense it into another. Ask yourself if the scene needs dialogue or action. Make it fast and punchy to keep readers engaged. Introduce a new obstacle that must be surmounted.
  10. Make sure there are no passive characters. Empower them by putting them in situations that force them to take action.
  11. Avoid dreams, waking up and overheard conversations.
  12. Your villain, whether it be a person or a force, needs to arrive early.
  13. Create a history for each character before you write the first scene. Know who your character is, what he/she wants, what motivate him/her, and when confronted with a problem, does the character feel trapped or betrayed.
  14. When writing an emotional scene, try to channel that emotion before beginning. Feel the anger or the hurt. Remember what falling in love feels like.

I hope these tips help!

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month: March 21 & April 18 ,

and May 16  1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

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Filed under Events, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story…Navigating INDIWORLD

navigating-indiewordlNavigating Indieworld : a beginner’s guide to self-publishing and marketing your book / Julie A. Gerber and Carole P. Roman

Social media guru, Julie A. Gerber and award-winning author of forty-three best-selling, independently published books, Carole P. Roman, team up to travel the winding road of self-publishing, promoting, and marketing a book. Join these two self-help experts as they share their vast store of experience in an easy to read, comprehensive guide, complete with end of chapter checklists to keep an author on track.Learn the importance of a beta reader and the value of a good editor. Know what’s needed when preparing a list for choosing an illustrator. Compare the many ways to promote your book. Find out what each step can cost and where you can save. This guide takes new independent authors from the first draft, through publication and the complicated world of marketing. Included is a directory of resources to help get there faster.Navigating Indieworld will end up being the ultimate travel guide for writers on their journey to published author.

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 February 21 & March 21

April 18

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

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Filed under Events, Friends of the Library, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story…Discover & Go

THE RAMA EPIC:

HERO, HEROINE, ALLY, FOE
Asian Art Museum  free passes are available through Discover & Go program from the Library website 
The exhibition ends JAN 15, 2017

Bloody battles, daring rescues, passionate romance and a shape-shifting monkey warrior.

One of the world’s greatest works of literature, the Rama epic — the 2,500-year-old classic and its many versions — teems with excitement. The story of Prince Rama’s quest to defeat a powerful demonic king, rescue his abducted wife and re-establish order in the world is also, for many, a sacred tradition. For centuries, this beloved tale has been told again and again through visual and performing arts, literature and religious teachings in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and beyond.  

This exhibition invites you to explore the personalities and perspectives of four main characters: Rama; his wife Sita; Rama’s faithful monkey lieutenant Hanuman; and the 10-headed demon king Ravana. Spanning the ancient to the contemporary, this major international survey of 135 artworks captures the epic in a new light. Coursing beneath the drama and fantasy of the thrilling tale, discover timeless human struggles and poignant moments that will resonate with your own story.

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 January 17 & February 21

and March 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please bring pen & paper, or whatever you would like to use when writing.

Union City Library 510-284-0629

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Filed under Events, Links, News, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story…Oil Lamps

Oil Lamps

Submitted by Dennis Smith, Union City Library Member

Oil lamps are another of the many things that young people today are largely ignorant of.  To a lot of people oil lamps are right up there with wind up clocks and phones with a bell in them, curious relics of the past, things they had “back in the day,” whatever that stupid phrase means.  Meaningful statements are fading too, but that is another subject.

I got thinking about oil lamps as I was reflecting on a piece I wrote recently about mantel clocks. There is a connection of sorts between the two. Both were popular and in common use during the same period, and I realized that, for years, right next to my replica mantel clock sat a semi-modern oil lamp.

As I started writing this I had to ask myself, “What can you really say about an oil lamp?” And the answer is, not a lot.  There is really not a lot to be said.  The oil lamp has been around for thousands of years, and have not changed much in the last five hundred,  Oil lamps are not better than other lighting devices, they require some knowledge to use and maintain, and have a few disadvantages.  I like oil lamps but do not want to go back to using them exclusively.

Oil lamps are like mantle clocks, fun to have and know about and maybe it is knowing about them that is important.  But then one day, when the power goes out and the phone batteries dies, and the twenty something set feel cut off form the world, I can light my lamp and check the time on my wind up mantle clock. That might be a good time to read a real book. I think I still have one of those somewhere!

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 January 17 & February 21

and March 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please bring pen & paper, or whatever you would like to use when writing.

Union City Library 510-284-0629

Leave a comment

Filed under Events, News, Uncategorized, Union City Library

Write Your Story…Real Stories by Three Different Journalists

Door to door : the magnificent, maddening, mysterious world of transportation / Edward Humes

The Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and author of Garbology explores the daily miracles and madness behind ourdoor-to-door
have-it-now, same-day-delivery world, revealing just what it takes—and costs—to move us and our stuff door to door.

Using interviews, data and deep exploration of the hidden world of ports, traffic control centers, and the research labs defining our transportation future, acclaimed journalist Edward Humes breaks down the complex movements of humans, goods, and machines as never before, from increasingly car-less citizens to the distance UPS goes to deliver a leopard-printed phone case. Tracking one day in the life of his family in Southern California, Humes uses their commutes, traffic jams, grocery stops, and online shopping excursions as a springboard to explore the paradoxes and challenges inherent in our system. He ultimately makes clear that transportation is one of the few big things we can change—our personal choices do have a profound impact, and that fork in the road is coming up fast.

 

The unnatural world : the race to remake civilization in Earth’s newest age / David Biello

An award-winning environmental journalist, combining the historical perspective of The Song of the Dodo with theunnatural-world urgency of An Inconvenient Truth, examines the world we have created and chronicles the scientists, billionaires and ordinary people who are working toward saving the best home humanity is likely to ever have.

 

organicOrganic : a journalist’s quest to discover the truth behind food labeling / Peter Laufer, Ph.D

“After eating some suspect “organic” walnuts that he was shocked to find were produced in Kazakhstan, veteran journalist Peter Laufer traces the origins of items in his pantry back to the source, learning how easily we are tricked into buying “organic” claims”–

View the book trailer for Organic at: ….

Write Your Story @  the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 December 20 & January 17

and February 21

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please  bring pen & paper

Union City Library 510-284-0629

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews, Events, Links, News, Union City Library