Monday Children’s Book Reviews for July 21, 2014

Froggy Gets a Doggy by Jonathan London

“A pet!

“Mom has agreed: Froggy can have a pet. Off to the pet store they go. Mom would prefer a bunny or some mice, but Froggy and his little sister, Pollywogilina, have their hearts set on a doggy. And when Froggy sees the little dog with big brown eyes, he begs to take her home.

“Mom cautions Froggy about all the new responsibilities he will have taking care of Doggy, but Froggy’s sure there will be no problem. He doesn’t count on Doggy being more difficult to train than he expected.

“Froggy always lands himself in a pickle, but he always bounces back. That’s why everyone loves him!”       [JPB LONDON]

The Glass Sentence by S. E. Grove

“Boston, 1891. Sophia Tims comes from a family of explorers and cartologers who, for generations, have been traveling and mapping the New World - a world changed by the Great Disruption of 1799, when all the continents were flung into different time periods. Eight years ago, her parents left her with her uncle Shadrack, the foremost cartologer in Boston, and went on an urgent mission. They never returned. Life with her brilliant, absent-minded, adored uncle has taught Sophia to take care of herself.

“Then Shadrack is kidnapped. And Sophia, who has rarely been outside of Boston, is the only one who can search for him. Together with Theo, a refugee from the West, she travels over rough terrain and uncharted ocean, encounters pirates and traders, and relies on a combination of Shadrack’s maps, common sense, and her own slantwise powers of observation. But even as Sophia and Theo try to save Shadrack’s life, they are in danger of losing their own.”         [J GROVE]

I Can Make That! Fantastic Crafts for Kids by Mary Wallace

“The book one librarian called ‘the best craft book she’d ever seen’ has been updated to introduce a new generation of children to the fun of crafts. Children as young as four years old can take common household items and easy-to-obtain natural materials like twigs and turn them into costumes, puppets, toys, games, and more. Step-by-step instructions and photographs keep things simple and easy to understand, making this book perfect for home, school, library, camp, or even daycare. Accessible and fun, the very doable crafts of I Can Make That! provide young crafters the opportunity to develop new skills and leave them with a sense of accomplishment.”                                 [J745.5 WALLACE]

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San Francisco: A Food Biography

sanfranciscoSan Francisco is a relatively young city with a well-deserved reputation as a food destination, situated near lush farmland and a busy port. San Francisco’s famous restaurant scene has been the subject of books, but the full complexity of the city’s culinary history is revealed here for the first time. This food biography presents the story of how food traveled from farms to markets, from markets to kitchens, and from kitchens to tables, focusing on how people experienced the bounty of the City by the Bay.”

Erica J. Peters is the author of Appetites and Aspirations in Vietnam. Food and Drink in the Long Nineteenth Century (2011).she lives in the Bay Area and is director and cofounder of the Culinary Historians of Northern California.

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for July 14, 2014

Digger Dog by William Bee

Digger Dog loves to dig up bones – the bigger the better. But for the biggest bone in the world, what will Digger Dog need? The biggest digger in the world, of course! All through the story, the diggers get bigger, the hole gets deeper and there is the most fantastic fold-out surprise at the end!”               [JPB BEE]

Tiny Rabbit’s Big Wish by Margarita Engle

“Tiny rabbit dreams of growing as big as the forest and as tall as the trees, yet no matter how hard he wishes, he stays the same small size. But in a jungle filled with beasts both big and small, perhaps being tiny is just right! Inspired by the rhythms and humor of Afro-Cuban folktales, award-winning author Margarita Engle wrote this charming picture book in honor of every child’s favorite springtime animal.”    [JPB ENGLE]

Three Bird Summer by Sara St. Antoine

An introspective boy and an adventurous girl uncover a poignant family mystery during a summer on the shores of Three Bird Lake.

“For as long as he can remember, Adam and his parents have spent their summers at his grandmother’s rustic cabin on Three Bird Lake. But this year will be different. There will be no rowdy cousins running around tormenting Adam. There will be no Uncle John or Aunt Jean. And there’ll be no Dad to fight with Mom. This year, the lake will belong just to Adam.

“But then Adam meets Alice, the girl next door, who seems to want to become friends. Alice looks just like the aloof, popular girls back home—what could he and she possibly have in common?
Turns out, Alice isn’t like the girls back home. She’s frank, funny, and eager for adventure. And when Adam’s grandma starts to leave strange notes in his room—notes that hint at a hidden treasure somewhere at the lake and a love from long ago—Alice is the one person he can rely on to help solve the mysteries of Three Bird Lake.”                          [J ST. ANTOINE]

Fantastic Finger Puppets to Make Yourself by Thomasina Smith

“Have toys at your fingertips – and on your toes – including angels, aliens, a peacock, an octopus, a mermaid, a waltzing couple and a goofy horse. How to make perfect puppets from old socks, rubber gloves, cardboard, kitchen foil and ping-pong balls, as well as puppet stages on which to perform! Easy instructions and over 270 fantastic photographs show you what to do every step of the way. It is ideal for 7- to 12-year-olds, with simple projects for beginners, and more sophisticated projects for older kids. Watch your hands transform into birds, animals, flowers, forests and all sorts of other amazing characters. The 25 projects in this book include not only finger puppets, but also glove puppets, body-pained puppets, and even foot puppets. All the projects are simple and fun to do, and you can make them using everyday items found around the home, such as gloves, socks, ribbons, wool, buttons, beads and drinking straws. Then, why not use your puppets to make up stories with your friends?”                                  [J745.59224 SMITH]

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Write Your Story @ the Union City Library

Join our senior library member Bruce Haase

and write your memoir. Bruce is life long reader, he noeiffel_tower_bluew writes memoir-based, creative non-fiction.

These are  informal meetings ,

to support each other and organize your thoughts

for writing. Sharing is optional.

 Meetings take place

The Third Tuesday of the month

July 15, August 19,

and September 16

1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please  bring pen & paper

For more information contact Bruce Hasse

Email:  ohnjca@comcast.net

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Salaam Love & Love InshAllah

These books explore the journeys of these individuals trying to walk the line between cultural norms and personal choices as they navigate through dual identities, generational gaps, coming of age, racism  and self-actualization.

Each story magnifies the life of these young people and through them , magnifies the community psyche.

“Muslim men are stereotyped as either oversexed Casanovas willing to die for seventy-two virgins in heaven or controlling, big-bearded husbands ready to rampage at the hint of dishonor. The truth is, there are millions of Muslim men trying to figure out the complicated terrain of love, sex, and relationships just like any other American man.In Salaam, Love, Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi provide a space for American Muslim men to speak o
penly about their romantic lives, offering frank, funny, and insightful glimpses into their hearts—and bedrooms. The twenty-two writers come from a broad spectrum of ethnic, racial, and religious perspectives—including orthodox, cultural, and secular Muslims—reflecting the strength and diversity of their faith community and of America.By raising their voices to share stories of love and heartbreak, loyalty and betrayal, intimacy and insecurity, these Muslim men are leading the way for all men to recognize that being open and honest about their feelings is not only okay—it’s intimately connected to their lives and critical to their happiness and well-being.’

Love InshAllah “These heartfelt tales are filled with passion and hope,loss and longing. One follows the quintessential single woman in the big city as she takes a chance on a Muslim speed-dating event. Another tells of a shy student from a liberal college town who falls in love online and must reveal her secret to her conservative family. A third recounts a Southern girl who surprises herself by agreeing to an arranged marriage, unexpectedly finding the love of her life.These compelling stories of love and romance create an irresistible balance of heart-warming and tantalizing, always revealing and deeply relevant.”

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for July 7, 2014

Tea With Grandpa by Barney Saltzberg

“Spending time with Grandpa is always fun. Singing, laughing, eating, and playing. And when it’s time to say goodbye, it won’t be for long because he’s never too far away to have tea.

“In this sweetly simple, rhyming picture book by acclaimed author/artist Barney Saltzberg, a little girl tells us about her daily tea ritual with her grandfather where they sing and laugh and clink their teacups with the help of their computers and a video chat.”                  [JPB SALTZBERG]

Abby Spencer Goes to Bollywood by Varsha Bajaj

“What thirteen-year-old Abby wants most is to meet her father. She just never imagined he would be a huge film star–in Bollywood! Now she’s traveling to Mumbai to get to know her famous father. Abby is overwhelmed by the culture clash, the pressures of being the daughter of India’s most famous celebrity, and the burden of keeping her identity a secret. But as she learns to navigate her new surroundings, she just might discover where she really belongs.”                   [J BAJAJ]

Dressing Up! 50 Step-by-Step Amazing Outfits to Make and Faces to Paint by Petra Boase

“Easy-to-make, effective costumes and fantastic disguises using everyday materials and face paints – animals galore, fun fantasy figures and plenty of spooky Halloween creatures as well, with 400 step-by-step photographs to show you what to do.”             [J391 BOASE]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for June 30, 2014

Poppy the Pirate Dog’s New Shipmate by Liz Kessler

“Poppy is lonely. Now that summer is over, Suzy and Tim have gone back to school and Mom and Dad are back at work. What’s a pirate dog to do when there’s no one around to help her bury treasure? When her family decides to get her a friend to keep her company, Poppy is thrilled. But when she meets her new shipmate, he is not at all what she expected — or wanted! Will mutiny ensue?”                 [J Moving Up KESSLER]

Maleficent by Elizabeth Rudnick

“The origins of one of the most iconic Disney villains: Maleficent, the infamous fairy who curses Princess Aurora in Disney’s animated classic Sleeping Beauty. This ‘origin’ story is told from Maleficent’s perspective, intersecting with the classic in both familiar and unexpected ways.”                  [J RUDNICK]

Cities: Discover How They Work by Kathleen M. Reilly

“To a child, a city is a chaotic, vibrant community whose workings can seem quite mysterious. How did people create subways? How does the water get to the very top of a skyscraper? Is there any organization to a bustling metropolis? Cities: Discover How They Work gives kids a view into the inner functioning of urban areas. They’ll learn about all the parts that come together to make cities work and how they’ve grown and changed since the very first riverside settlements.”                      [J307.76 REILLY]

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