Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 28, 2016

buddy-and-earl-and-the-great-big-babyBuddy and Earl and the Great Big Baby by Maureen Fergus

“Mom’s friend Mrs. Cunningham is coming for a visit, and she’s bringing her baby! While Buddy the dog tries to explain the ins and outs of babydom to Earl the hedgehog, neither of them is prepared for the chaos the small and adorable creature brings with it. When the baby manages to escape from its cage– which Buddy gently suggests is really just a playpen– it’s up to our favorite odd couple to save the day.” The third book in the Buddy and Earl series.         [JPB FERGUS,M]

fly-guys-ninja-christmasFly Guy’s Ninja Christmas by Todd Arnold

” It is Christmas Eve and Fly Guy realizes that he does not have a present to give to his best friend Buzz–but when he looks around the house searching for something suitable he discovers a stranger in a red suit, and decides to attack with some ninja moves.”  From the Fly Guy series.             [JE ARNOLD,T]

first-last-dayThe First Last Day by Dorian Cirrone

“The magic of summer comes to life in this enchanting middle grade debut about an eleven-year-old girl who must save the future by restarting time after she realizes that her wish to relive the last day of summer may not have been such a great thing after all.

“After finding a mysterious set of paints in her backpack, eleven-year-old Haleigh Adams paints a picture of her last day at the New Jersey shore. When she wakes up the next morning, Haleigh finds that her wish for an endless summer with her new friend Kevin has come true. At first, she’s thrilled, but Haliegh soon learns that staying in one place—and time—comes with a price.

“And when Haleigh realizes her parents have been keeping a secret, she is faced with a choice: do nothing and miss out on the good things that come with growing up or find the secret of the time loop she’s trapped in and face the inevitable realities of moving on.

“As she and Kevin set out to find the source of the magic paints, Haleigh worries it might be too late. Will she be able to restart time? Or will it be the biggest mistake of her life?”                 [J CIRRONE,D]

everything-you-need-to-ace-american-historyEverything You Need to Ace American History in One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide by Lily Rothman

“An exciting book for all middle schoolers (6th-8th grade) who wish they had taken better notes in american history class or just want to jump to the head of the class. Each Big Fat Notebook is like getting to borrow the notebook of the best student in American history class, the one who not only writes down the important points the teacher makes—noting those crucial “you will get tested on these” facts—but also meticulously transcribes key points from the chalkboard and pastes teacher handouts into her notebook. Part “CliffsNotes,” part workbook, this study hack will help kids focus on the things they need to remember in order to rock their middle school exams and ace american history.

Everything You Need to Ace American History in One Big Fat Notebook covers the following topics and more:

Native Americans
The Colonies
The Revolutionary War
American Expansion
The War of 1812
Civil War Reconstruction
The Industrial Revolution
Immigration Imperialism
World War I & II
The Great Depression
The New Deal
Civil Rights
The Vietnam War
The Cold War
9/11
War in Iraq
Universal Healthcare                                                                [ J973.071 EVERYTHING]

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 21, 2016

sharing-the-breadSharing the Bread: And Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving Story by Pat Zietlow Miller

“Celebrate food and family with this heartwarming Thanksgiving picture book. We will share the risen bread. / Our made-with-love Thanksgiving spread. / Grateful to be warm and fed. / We will share the bread.In this spirited ode to the holiday, set at the turn of the twentieth century, a large family works together to make their special meal. Mama prepares the turkey, Daddy tends the fire, Sister kneads, and Brother bastes. Everyone—from Grandma and Grandpa to the littlest baby—has a special job to do. Told in spare, rhythmic verse and lively illustrations,Sharing the Bread is a perfect read-aloud to celebrate the Thanksgiving tradition.”               [JPB MILLER,P]

look-out-for-the-fitzgerald-troutsLook Out For The Fitzgerald-Trouts by Esta Spalding

“Kim Fitzgerald-Trout took to driving with ease–as most children would if their parents would ever let them try. She had to. After all, she and her siblings live in a car.

“Meet the Fitzgerald-Trouts, a band of four loosely related children living together in a lush tropical island. They take care of themselves. They sleep in their car, bathe in the ocean, eat fish they catch and fruit they pick, and can drive anywhere they need to go–to the school, the laundromat, or the drive-in. If they put their minds to it, the Fitzgerald-Trouts can do anything. Even, they hope, find a real home.

“Award-winning poet and screenwriter Esta Spalding’s exciting middle grade debut establishes a marvelous place where children fend for themselves, and adults only seem to ruin everything. This extraordinary world is brought to vibrant life by Sydney Smith, the celebrated artist behind Sidewalk Flowers.”                        [J SPALDING,E]

storm-too-soonA Storm Too Soon: A Remarkable True Survival Story in 80-Foot Seas by Michael J. Tougias

“When a forty-seven-foot sailboat disappears in the Gulf Stream in the throes of a disastrous storm, it leaves behind three weary passengers struggling to stay alive. This middle-grade adaptation of an adult nonfiction book tells the story of the four intrepid Coast Guardsmen who braved this ruthless storm in the hopes of saving them. A spellbinding tale of courage and survival from the author of The Finest Hours, now a major motion picture.”                       [ J910.91634 TOUGIAS]

cooking-how-to-make-food-for-your-friendsCooking: How to Make Food for Your Friends, Your Family & Yourself by Patricia Daniels

“A first-step guide to cooking introduces such basic skills as chopping, mixing, and blending, and provides classic family recipes and tips for making an appetizing presentation.”                    [ J641.5 DANIELS]

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A Talk on Feeling Good @ the Union City Library

 

Feeling Good During the Holiday Season When You Know How to Manage Holiday Season Stress 

Sunday November 20, 2016
2:30 to 4:00 P.M.
 The panel from Feeling Good Therapy & Training Center  will be here to discuss keeping healthy boundaries and strategies to help with spending patterns, eating patterns and work habits.

Grace Khoo, LMFT

She obtained the Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy at University of San Francisco in August 2007.

She became a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in February 2013.

As seen on a Sussex Directories Inc site

She have 8 years of clinical experience in providing individual, couple and family therapy to clients from very diverse racial, cultural, socioeconomic, and religious backgrounds.

Her specialties are #1: relational issues (intimate relationship problems, family conflicts, peers issues, relationship with self, lack of social life), #2: stress management (coping with stress from work, coping with divorce, coping with physical health issues etc.) and #3: working with individuals/families who relocated from another country.

She can speak other languages. She reads and writes in Mandarin fluently. She can also have casual conversation in Cantonese and Hokkien.

Karen Yeh, Ed.M. Psy.D.

She works with individuals, couples, and families.  She established her private practice working exclusively withpsychologist-karenyeh children, teens and their parents.  Her practice has developed to treat individual adults as well.  Her skills address mood problems—such as feeling depressed, hopeless or anxious and stressed.  Her relationship work includes problems between peers at work or in school, between parents and kids, between spouses or partners, or just problems relating to other people or situations.  Dr. Yeh employs a trans diagnostic patient-centered approach to cognitive therapy.  Translated: her work with her patients is tailored to the individual, rather than to the diagnosis, and her approach is based on the idea that how people think affects how they feel.  Her goals are to facilitate, teach, and equip her patients with the tools to deal with their problems.  Dr. Yeh is a graduate of MIT where she majored in biology.  She received a Master Degree in Counseling and Consulting Psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and earned a Doctor of Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology.  Her private practice is based in Fremont, CA.

Tu Hoang, MA, MFTI

Engaged in the healing arts, I believe in the power of relationships and connection. I offer effpsychologist-tuective skills and tools to connect with yourself and others. To overcome anxiety and depression. You will not only be equipped with tools, you’ll leave feeling good and empowered to connect deeply.    
katie-dashtban

Katie Dashtban, Psy.D. 

Dr. Dashtban is a licensed health psychologist. Her specialty is in treating persons who suffer with both medical and psychological symptoms. She is the co-founder of Feeling Good Therapy and Training Center in Fremont. She is a graduate of California School of Professional Psychology and has completed her pre doctoral internship at UCSF department of Psychosocial Medicine and her Post-Doctoral fellowship at Kaiser Permanente department of Pain Management in San Francisco.

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Monday Children’s Book Reviews for November 14, 2016

nanobotsNanoBots by Chris Gall

“A boy inventor creates the ultimate in high-tech superheroes that could one day save the world–but they have some smaller problems to take on first! NanoBots are tiny. They’re almost too small to see, but they can each do a unique and important job: Medibot makes sure their Inventor never catches a cold…. Chewbots gobble up that gum the Inventor trampled into the carpet… Binobot scans the scene of a crime for clues the Inventor could never see… and Seekerbots explore to meet microscopic new creatures.

“These bots and their high-tech friends sure make the inventor’s life easier, but when the most AWESOME robot in town is in real trouble, they must band together and prove that sometimes the SMALLEST helpers can be the BIGGEST heroes! Includes fun facts about real nanotechnology in the backmatter.”             [JPB GALL,C]

murder-is-bad-mannersMurder is Bad Manners by Robin Stevens

“Two friends form a detective agency—and must solve their first murder case—in this ‘sharp-witted debut’ (Publishers Weekly, starred review) that is the first adventure in a brand-new middle grade mystery series set at a 1930s boarding school.

“Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are best friends at Deepdean School for Girls, and they both have a penchant for solving mysteries. In fact, outspoken Daisy is a self-described Sherlock Holmes, and she appoints wallflower Hazel as her own personal Watson when they form their own (secret!) detective agency. The only problem? They have nothing to investigate.

“But that changes once Hazel discovers the body of their science teacher, Miss Bell—and the body subsequently disappears. She and Daisy are certain a murder must have taken place, and they can think of more than one person with a motive.

“Determined to get to the bottom of the crime—and to prove that it happened—before the killer strikes again, Hazel and Daisy must hunt for evidence, spy on their suspects, and use all the cunning, scheming, and intuition they can muster. But will they succeed? And can their friendship stand the test?”                 [J STEVENS,R]

everything-you-need-to-ace-englishEverything You Need to Ace English Language Arts In One Big Fat Notebook: The Complete Middle School Study Guide

“An exciting book for all middle schoolers (6th-8th grade) who wish they had taken better notes in English class or just want to jump to the head of the class. Each Big Fat Notebook is like getting to borrow the notebook of the best student in English class, the one who not only writes down the important points the teacher makes—noting those crucial ‘you will get tested on these’ facts—but also meticulously transcribes key points from the chalkboard and pastes teacher handouts into her notebook. Part ‘CliffsNotes,’ part workbook, this study hack will help kids focus on the things they need to remember in order to rock their middle school exams and ace English language arts.”             [J372.61 EVERYTHING]

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Write Your Story… Doors

The Story Behind a Door

 Submitted by the Union City Library Member Rita K.

At Discover —I recently asked Divyakshi Gupta- a photographer and traveler based in Mumbai — about her obsession with doors:

I often think doors are veils to homes. Each have a distinct character, speaking volumes of the people living behind the door. It’s fun to guess what could possibly be behind a door — an array of secrets, emotions, and mysteries. A home with laughter, heartaches, hopes, banter, and more.

Behind every door is a story, says Divyakshi. I love this thought: that any door you encounter — while walking through your neighborhood or exploring a new place — can lead to a story, an opportunity, or a glimpse into another’s life.

For this Discover Challenge, let’s focus on a door. You’re free to interpret this challenge as you see fit, and respond in any genre or medium, as long as a door — real or imagined — is your primary inspiration. Ideas:

 

▪ Memoirists and nonfiction writers: Tell us about the time you were hesitant to physically enter a building. Share a story about the childhood home you miss. Describe a day when you felt, symbolically, that a door to something new opened, or a door to your past closed.

▪ Short story and fiction writers: Creatively use a door as the main setting of your story. Personify a door in your tale.

▪ Poets: Write a haiku or sonnet — or your preferred poetic form — about a door, or entering or exiting a place or phase in your life.

▪ Photographers: Get inspired by the doors of India captured by Divyakshi, or these doors I’ve photographed on my travels, then get outside and capture your own.

▪ Artists: Draw a door you’ve encountered while out on a walk, illustrate a door in your own home, or sketch a doorway during a museum visit.

For this challenge, the door is wide open.

DOORS:  Insights & Comments

Transition and metamorphosis are the most common ideas represented by the symbol of the door; it is a passage from one place to another, between different states, between lightness and darkness. According to Julien, the act of passing over the threshold signifies that one must leave behind his materialism and personality to confront inner silence and meditation. It is abandoning the old and embracing the new; an open door signifies welcome and invites discovery and investigation, while a closed door represents rejection, protection, secrecy, exclusion, and imprisonment.

Is a feminine symbol in connection with the hole that it leads to, the vagina; the antithesis of the wall. Doors hold the essence of mystery, separating two distinct areas, keeping things apart. They are a barrier, a boundary, which must be negotiated, before the threshold can be crossed. The mysterious beyond is hidden from sight by the closed door, and some sort of action must be taken before the other side becomes visible and available to us. The closed door is full of potential, for anything might lie beyond, as yet unknown and unseen. Yet the closed door may also be limiting, preventing us ever gaining access to its hidden contents.

Sometimes gaining access may be as simple as approaching and turning the handle, but perhaps the door is locked. Then we need to knock or ring the bell and negotiate with the guardian or keeper of the door. Saying the right words, or holding the correct credentials will then secure our passage. This theme recurrs in countless fairytales and myths, from Ali Baba to Cuchulin. Belonging to the club or group which lies within, or paying the doorkeeper might also secure passage, but some doors remain stubbornly closed, unless you hold the key.

The doors may remain closed to protect those who live within, or to maintain a secret, or to keep a space sacred and to keep out the profane. These nunnery doors are heavily fortified, and their protective powers are boosted by the stone guardians watching from above. Lions, bulls and flames are frequent guardian symbols found on and around doors, adding to the protective qualities of the barrier.

So when we face a closed door, we face a choice. What action will we take? Will we turn back defeated by the barrier,or will we push forwards and attempt to gain access? The nature of the door itself, and its guardians may well shape our choice, helping us decide if we will feel comfortable with what lies beyond. The symbolism of a door closing on us, is one of an opportunity fading, of a potential now lost to us.. That way no longer lies open to us without negotiation and effort.

The symbolism of a door opening to us, is one of exciting new potential. The block which stood before us has now been removed and we are free to move forwards, and to cross the threshold into something new. We are invited forwards into change, with nothing to negotiate except the transition of one place to another. The guardian of the threshold is welcoming us forwards. Change beckons us with open arms.

So the door is protective guarding the doorway, denying or allowing passage through from one place or one state to another. The symbolism of the door is closely bound with the symbols of doorways and thresholds, and of keys and locks, hinges and handles, bells and guardians. The door itself either allows movement forwards or prevents it, and in this way we can see the door as a symbol of duality, as it is either closed or open, locked or unlocked.

SYMBOLISM OF DOORS

Doors hold the essence of mystery, separating two distinct areas, keeping things apart. They are a barrier, a boundary, which must be negotiated, before the threshold can be crossed. The mysterious beyond is hidden from sight by the closed door, and some sort of action must be taken before the other side becomes visible and available to us. The closed door is full of potential, for anything might lie beyond, as yet unknown and unseen. Yet the closed door may also be limiting, preventing us ever gaining access to its hidden contents.

Sometimes gaining access may be as simple as approaching and turning the handle, but perhaps the door is locked. Then we need to knock or ring the bell and negotiate with the guardian or keeper of the door. Saying the right words, or holding the correct credentials will then secure our passage. This theme recurrs in countless fairytales and myths, from Ali Baba to Cuchulin. Belonging to the club or group which lies within, or paying the doorkeeper might also secure passage, but some doors remain stubbornly closed, unless you hold the key.

The doors may remain closed to protect those who live within, or to maintain a secret, or to keep a space sacred and to keep out the profane. These nunnery doors are heavily fortified, and their protective powers are boosted by the stone guardians watching from above. Lions, bulls and flames are frequent guardian symbols found on and around doors, adding to the protective qualities of the barrier.

When we face a closed door, we face a choice. What action will we take? Will we turn back defeated by the barrier,or will we push forwards and attempt to gain access? The nature of the door itself, and its guardians may well shape our choice, helping us decide if we will feel comfortable with what lies beyond. The symbolism of a door closing on us, is one of an opportunity fading, of a potential now lost to us.. That way no longer lies open to us without negotiation and effort.

Symbolism of a door opening to us, is one of exciting new potential. The block which stood before us has now been removed and we are free to move forwards, and to cross the threshold into something new. We are invited forwards into change, with nothing to negotiate except the transition of one place to another. The guardian of the threshold is welcoming us forwards. Change beckons us with open arms.

So the door is protective guarding the doorway, denying or allowing passage through from one place or one state to another. The symbolism of the door is closely bound with the symbols of doorways and thresholds, and of keys and locks, hinges and handles, bells and guardians. The door itself either allows movement forwards or prevents it, and in this way we can see the door as a symbol of duality, as it is either closed or open, locked or unlocked.

The root of the English word door lies in the Sanskrit word Duarah, which means two doors or gates. From this comes the Greek Thura, the German Tur, Middle English Dure or Dor, Old Norse Dyrr and these all mean door. We also find the Gaulish Doro which means mouth, giving us an interesting image of the lips as double doors to our mouths and the words beyond. A guarded way in and out of our bodies.

Write Your Story

@

the Union City Library


eiffel_tower_blue
Join our library group, headed by Bruce Hasse, for an   informal gathering of aspiring writers of all types of genres. Your writing can be memoirs, creative non-fiction, poetry, song lyrics, science fiction, plays,essays, you name it!  We just want to hear what you have written and support each other as we grow as writers.

Sharing is optional.

Meetings take place

Third Tuesday of the month

 November 15 & December 20

and January 17

 1 p.m. — 3 p.m.

Please  bring pen & paper

Union City Library 510-284-0629

 

 

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Art for Adults @ Union City Library

ART for ADULTS @ THE UNION CITY LIBRARY

                                             Saturday,  November 12, 2016art-for-adult-november-12

2:30 p.m. to  4:00 p.m.

Create your own design of jewelry!

supplies and instruction will be provided by

Christie’s Creative Cupboard.art-for-adult-nov-12

  This class is 24 attendees.  

Please register by calling 510-745-1464

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Today is the day to VOTE!

Don’t know your polling place? Check here

Did you vote by mail or drop off your ballot early and want to know if it was received? Check here

Make your vote count! Your vote is important!

Image result for vote free clip art

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